Wednesday April 8, 2020
Home Lead Story Young Mothers...

Young Mothers are More Prone To Have Mental Health Problems: Study

Almost 40 per cent of young moms have more than one mental health issue, including depression, a range of anxiety disorders and hyperactivity

0
//
Mothers
The study said identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children. Pixabay

Researchers have found that two out of three young mothers have at least one mental health issue.

The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that teen mothers have a much higher prevalence of mental health challenges than mothers aged 21 and older and teens who aren’t parents.

Almost 40 per cent of young moms have more than one mental health issue, including depression, a range of anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

This is up to four times higher than in mothers aged 21 years or older and teens without children, the researchers said,

“Now that we understand that young mothers can struggle with problems other than just postpartum depression, our findings can be used to develop better screening processes, more effectively detect mental health problems in teenaged mothers, and direct treatment,” said study researcher Ryan Van Lieshout from McMaster University in Canada.

For the findings, Between 2012 and 2015, the Young Mothers Health Study recruited 450 mothers aged younger than 21 years old and 100 comparison mothers aged older than 20 years old at the time of their first delivery. The moms were from Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand-Norfolk, and Brant counties.

This study is the one of the first in the world to use diagnostic interviews to examine a range of mental health problems beyond postpartum depression.

“Structured diagnostic interviews are the gold standard for this kind of research. We’re glad to have used this method to talk to hundreds of young mothers about their experiences,” said study lead author Van Lieshout.

Brain
Researchers have found that two out of three young mothers have at least one mental health issue. Pixabay

Age-matched young mothers were also compared with 15 to 17-year-old women without children from the 2014 Ontario Child Health Study who were assessed for mental disorders, the researchers said.

The study said identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children.

ALSO READ: Google Starts Warning Against The Installation of Chrome Extensions on Edge Browser

“Young mothers can face a great deal of adversity both before and after becoming a parent, yet next-to-nothing has been known about the rates and types of significant mental health problems among these women in our community,” Lieshout said. (IANS)

Next Story

Consistent Bedtime Routine Reduces Risk of Obesity in Children

0
bedtime
Following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children's risk of becoming overweight or obese. Pixabay

Dear parents, kindly take note. Researchers have found that going to bed early and following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children’s risk of becoming overweight or obese.

“While we know it can be hard to get children to bed early, and at consistent times both on weekdays and at weekends, it might help parents or carers to know that establishing consistent and early bedtime may reduce the risk that their child will be overweight or obese,” said study lead author Yaqoot Fatima from the University of Queensland and James Cook University in Australia.

For the findings, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, the research team wanted to explore sleep patterns in indigenous Australian children and assess the role of sleep timing in longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI).In the study of 1,258 Indigenous Australian children were picked with an average age of 6 years.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news

bedtime
The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtime for children. Pixabay

Latent profile analysis was conducted with the Australian Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC) cohort data, to determine distinct patterns of bed and wake timing, taking account of weekday sleep duration, weekday and weekend bedtimes, and weekday wake times.

Multilevel models with a random intercept were used to investigate the role of baseline sleep pattern in predicting longitudinal changes in BMI.

Please follow NewsGram on Facebook to get updates on the latest news

The researchers found that children who consistently went to bed late experienced greater weight gain over several years than those who went to bed early.

Also Read- Know How Smoking Cigarettes at a Young Age Can be Harmful

The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtimes for children.

“As sleep timing is modifiable, this offers the opportunity for improvement in sleep and protecting against future weight gain in indigenous children,” the researchers noted. (IANS)