Sunday August 25, 2019

Study: Young People Post on Social Media Under the Influence of Drugs and then Regret Later on

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities

0
//
drugs, social media
Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. Pixabay

Posting on social media, texting or calling while high on drugs is prevalent among young people, and many say that they regret this behaviour later, researchers said. “Risky social media posts, including those showing people high on drugs, have the potential to cause embarrassment, stress and conflict for users and those in their social networks,” said study lead author Joseph Palamar, Associate Professor at New York University.

“It can also have adverse implications for one’s career, since the majority of employers now use social media platforms to screen job candidates and may search for evidence of substance use,” he added. Published in the journal Substance Abuse, the study points to the potential social harm associated with substance use which are likely overlooked and go beyond well-established health risks. For the study, the researchers examined data from 872 adults surveyed while entering electronic dance music (EDM) parties in New York City who reported current or previous drug use.

The researchers estimate that more than a third of EDM attendees (34.3 per cent) posted on social media while high, with 21.4 per cent regretting it. In addition, more than half (55.9 per cent) had texted or called someone while high, with 30.5 per cent regretting making a call or sending a text. Nearly half (47.6 per cent) had been in a photo while high, with 32.7 per cent regretting it.

drugs, social media
Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high. Pixabay

“At least one in five experienced regret after engaging in these behaviours while high, suggesting that some situations may have resulted in socially harmful or embarrassing scenarios,” Palamar said. Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high.

ALSO READ: Russia State Hacking Group ‘Fancy Bear’ Using IoT Devices as a Way to Breach Corporate Networks

Although young adults are a known high-risk demographic for substance use, females are typically at lower risk than males. However, research shows that females are more likely to use social media. EDM attendees who identified as neither heterosexual, nor gay, nor bisexual were also at a higher risk for social media posting and related behaviours while high.

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities. Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. (IANS)

Next Story

Smartphones Do Not Damage Mental Health Of Adolescents

Spending time on phone not so bad for mental health

0
mental health
For the mental health study published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, researchers surveyed more than 2,000 teenagers (aged between 10 and 15 years). Pixabay

In contrast to generally held views about the negative impact of using smartphones, researchers have found that teenagers spending time on their phones and online is not that bad for mental health.

“Contrary to the common belief that smartphones and social media are damaging adolescents’ mental health, we don’t see much support for the idea that time spent on phones and online is associated with increased risk for mental health problems,” said Michaeline Jensen, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina.

For the study published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, researchers surveyed more than 2,000 teenagers (aged between 10 and 15 years). The researchers collected reports of mental health symptoms from the adolescents three times a day and also reported on their daily technology usage each night.

They analysed whether youth who engaged more with digital technologies were more likely to experience mental health symptoms but they found that increased digital technology use was not related to worse mental health.

Researchers said that teenagers who reported sending more text messages reported feeling better (less depressed) than kids who were less frequent texters. Advising against excessive use of technology, experts emphasised on its responsible use.

According to Samir Parikh, Consultant Psychiatrist and Director at Fortis Mental Health Programme in Noida, life for a young person needs to be well balanced with indoor and outdoor activities, and the studying time should be also balanced with the time to have fun.

Mental Health
The researchers collected reports of mental health symptoms from the adolescents three times a day and also reported on their daily technology usage each night. Pixabay

“TV, Internet, online games, social media needs to be used in limit and never at cost of peer interaction, family time, sports and studies. The key is to find the right balance. Using phones to connect with friends is good but students should also be well compensated with in-person interactions,” he told IANS.

Also Read: NRAI To Initiate Movement Against Online Food Delivery Apps

“Social media can be used positively to express views, choices and bring positivity. At the same time, children should be empowered with skills to deal with social media effectively,” he added. Adults need to be good role models and help shape the overall lifestyle balance for children.

“Content is as important as the user mindset and his environment to create a pathological condition called ‘internet addiction’,” Mrinmay Kumar Das, Senior Consultant, at Jaypee Hospital, told IANS. (IANS)