Wednesday November 13, 2019

Study: Young People Post on Social Media Under the Influence of Drugs and then Regret Later on

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities

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drugs, social media
Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. Pixabay

Posting on social media, texting or calling while high on drugs is prevalent among young people, and many say that they regret this behaviour later, researchers said. “Risky social media posts, including those showing people high on drugs, have the potential to cause embarrassment, stress and conflict for users and those in their social networks,” said study lead author Joseph Palamar, Associate Professor at New York University.

“It can also have adverse implications for one’s career, since the majority of employers now use social media platforms to screen job candidates and may search for evidence of substance use,” he added. Published in the journal Substance Abuse, the study points to the potential social harm associated with substance use which are likely overlooked and go beyond well-established health risks. For the study, the researchers examined data from 872 adults surveyed while entering electronic dance music (EDM) parties in New York City who reported current or previous drug use.

The researchers estimate that more than a third of EDM attendees (34.3 per cent) posted on social media while high, with 21.4 per cent regretting it. In addition, more than half (55.9 per cent) had texted or called someone while high, with 30.5 per cent regretting making a call or sending a text. Nearly half (47.6 per cent) had been in a photo while high, with 32.7 per cent regretting it.

drugs, social media
Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high. Pixabay

“At least one in five experienced regret after engaging in these behaviours while high, suggesting that some situations may have resulted in socially harmful or embarrassing scenarios,” Palamar said. Females and young adults (aged 18-24) were particularly at an elevated risk for posting on social media while high and were also more likely to text, make calls, and take photos while high.

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Although young adults are a known high-risk demographic for substance use, females are typically at lower risk than males. However, research shows that females are more likely to use social media. EDM attendees who identified as neither heterosexual, nor gay, nor bisexual were also at a higher risk for social media posting and related behaviours while high.

Separately, black participants were at a much lower risk for these activities. Compared to users of other drugs, current marijuana users were at the highest risk for engaging in these risky behaviours while high, followed by current cocaine users. (IANS)

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Twitter Shares Child Abuse Content On Social Media: IWF

IWF report says that Twitter leads to child abuse content

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child abuse
IWF report revealed that most of the child abuse content on social media is shared by Twitter. Pixabay

The UK-based Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) has revealed that nearly half of the child abuse content in the social media space is being shared openly on micro-blogging platform Twitter.

According to a report in The Telegraph that accessed the IWF data, 49 per cent of the images, videos and url links it found on social media, search engines and cloud services in the last three years were on Twitter – “making up 1,396 of the total 2,835 incidents”.

This is a scary incident as the child abuse images and videos slipped through Twitter’s filters and were available for anyone to see.

According to the IWF, it helps minimise the availability of online sexual abuse content, specifically child sexual abuse content hosted anywhere in the world. The majority of its work focuses on the removal of child sexual abuse images and videos.

“We search for child sexual abuse images and videos and offer a place for the public to report them anonymously. We then have them removed,” it said on its website.

Microsoft’s Bing search engine was second in the IWF report, with 604 incidents recorded between 2016 and 2018, followed by Amazon with 375 and Google with 348.

“The IWF found 72 incidents of abuse being openly hosted on Facebook, 18 on its sister site Instagram and 22 on YouTube,” said the report.

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Earlier reports claimed that Microsoft’s search engine Bing is still serving child porn. Pixabay

A Twitter spokesperson replied to the IWF report: “We have serious concerns about the accuracy of these figures and the metrics used to produce them. We will continue to work with the IWF to address their concerns and improve the accuracy of their data”.

Susie Hargreaves OBE, CEO of the IWF said that “our data is accurate and recorded fairly and consistently regardless of where we find child sexual abuse material”.

Microsoft also questioned the IWF data.

Earlier reports claimed that Microsoft’s search engine Bing is still serving child porn, and certain search terms on the platform brought up child porn images and related keywords.

“Microsoft’s Bing search engine reportedly still served up child porn, nearly a year after the tech giant said it was addressing the issue.

“The news comes as part of a report in The New York Times that looks at what the newspaper says is a failure by tech companies to adequately address child pornography on their platforms,” reports CNET.

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The tech giant has long been at the forefront of combating abuse imagery, even creating a detection tool called “PhotoDNA” almost a decade ago. But many criminals have turned to its search engine Bing as a reliable tool.

“Part of the issue is privacy, some companies say,” said the report. (IANS)