Sunday October 21, 2018

Youth icons of Kerala call for tobacco-free educational institutions in the state

Educational institutions, which are the grooming grounds for creating responsible citizens, have to be kept tobacco-free, says Jayachandran

0
//
261
Tobacco
Use of Tobacco. Wikimedia Commons
Republish
Reprint

Thiruvananthapuram, August 24, 2016: Popular youth icons of Kerala have appealed to the state government and society to work towards making educational institutions here tobacco-free.

Popular music composer, singer and musician M. Jayachandran, state-award winning actor Parvathy Thiruvothu and Chairman of Kochi-based Startup Village Sanjay Vijayakumar have come together to fight the tobacco menace among youth.

Jayachandran said youngsters start off with cigarettes and tobacco and soon get lured by drugs. He said, “Educational institutions, which are the grooming grounds for creating responsible citizens, have to be kept tobacco-free.”

M. Jayachandran. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
M. Jayachandran. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

Vijayakumar said, “Kerala spends Rs 1,514 crore a year for cure and care of tobacco-induced cancers and other diseases. Educating youngsters about the ill-effects of tobacco use is important and campuses should be kept tobacco-free.”

Parvathy said that any form of substance abuse comes with a lot of humiliation. She said, “I wish the youth of this generation would explore life and experience the high of an addiction-free life.”

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

The Indian tobacco control law COTPA — Cigarettes or Other Tobacco Products Act 2003 — prohibits smoking in educational institutions and all forms of direct and indirect advertisements, promotion and sponsorships, besides prohibiting the sale of tobacco products within 100 yards of educational institutions. (IANS)

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

WHO Vows For Broader Action Against Tobacco

To prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies, the strategy requires parties to the treaty to protect national public health policies "from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry."

0
WHO
WHO vows tighter, broader action against tobacco, industry interference.

The World Health Organization (WHO) unveiled a global strategy on Saturday to scale up the tobacco control agenda over the next few years and to prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies.

The strategy, titled the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF), aims to strengthen implementation of the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC), with a roadmap to guide the work of the convention parties, the secretariat and other stakeholders with regards to tobacco control from 2019 to 2025, Xinhua reported.

“The adoption of this strategy marks a key milestone in strengthening the FCTC,” said Vera Luiza da Costa e Silva, head of the WHO FCTC Secretariat. “This strategy provides a very clear path forward, with priorities and objectives to reinforce government policies and accelerate global action for more effective implementation of the tobacco control treaty.”

The strategy was concluded during the eighth session (COP8) of the FCTC, which brought together over 1,200 participants, including delegations from 148 parties to the global tobacco control treaty and representatives of UN agencies, other intergovernmental organisations and civil society.

They also agreed to maximize transparency to protect FCTC related sessions and proceedings from the intrusion of tobacco industry representatives and interests.

WHO
Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus gives a news conference at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, VOA

“More than ever, we need to stay the course and strengthen our commitment to ensure that FCTC efforts to protect and promote public health and sustainable development are not hijacked by the tobacco industry,” Costa e Silva said. “We must yield no ground to the tobacco industry.”

To prevent further interference by tobacco industry in public health policies, the strategy requires parties to the treaty to protect national public health policies “from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry.”

In addition to tighter control actions, the parties also addressed the need for tobacco control efforts to integrate strategies to combat the destructive impacts of tobacco on the environment and sustainable development.

Also Read- Actor Varun Dhawan Thinks That People Took Time to Appreciate Him as a Good Actor

Since it came into force in 2005, the FCTC has resulted in national strategies and legislation that have introduced health warning on packages of tobacco and comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

As the only existing global intergovernmental meeting exclusively devoted to tobacco control, the FCTC COP has served as a platform for policy formulation and the adoption of implementation mechanisms by the parties to the convention. (IANS)