Tuesday February 19, 2019
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YouTube Bans Dangerous, Harmful Pranks From its Platform

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities - such as driving - while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result

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YouTube
YouTube bans dangerous, harmful pranks. Pixabay

YouTube videos that depict dangerous or emotionally distressing “pranks” have been banned from the platform.

The move comes in response to the so-called “challenges” that have sometimes resulted in death or injury, the BBC reported on Wednesday.

The Google-owned video sharing site said such material had “no place on YouTube”.

But enforcing its new rules on pranks may prove to be difficult, given ambiguity over what may or may not be considered harmful.

“YouTube is home to many beloved viral challenges and pranks,” a message added to the site’s FAQ section read.

“That said, we’ve always had policies to make sure what’s funny doesn’t cross the line into also being harmful or dangerous.

YouTube
YouTube. Pixabay

“Our Community Guidelines prohibit content that encourages dangerous activities that are likely to result in serious harm.”

From now on, the site said it would not allow videos that featured “pranks with a perceived danger of serious physical injury”.

This includes pranks where someone is tricked into thinking they are in severe danger, even if no real threat existed.

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The site added: “We also don’t allow pranks that cause children to experience severe emotional distress, meaning something so bad that it could leave the child traumatized for life.”

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities – such as driving – while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result. (IANS)

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YouTube Projects The Earth To Be Flat

According to Asheley Landrum, who led the research at Texas Tech University, identified the prime driver for the startling rise in the number of Flat-believers.

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Meanwhile, Google has acknowledged there's more it can do to combat the spread of false information on YouTube. In January, it outlined new plans designed to push back the false belief, according to the CNET. Pixabay

In a major goof-up, popular video-sharing platform YouTube projected it upon impressionable minds that — the Earth is flat — raising the number of people who now seriously believe the planet to be a flat unending stretch of land, a study said.

The fact which is to the contrary was proved almost five centuries back, when Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan famously circumnavigated the Earth from 1519-1522, which would have been impossible if it had had an edge.

However, Google-owned YouTube is now contributing to people believing the Earth is round.

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The fact which is to the contrary was proved almost five centuries back, when Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan famously circumnavigated the Earth from 1519-1522, which would have been impossible if it had had an edge. Pixabay

“Their suspicion was raised when they attended the world’s largest gatherings of ‘Flat Earthers’ at the movement’s annual conference in Rayleigh, North Carolina, in 2017, and then in Denver, Colorado, last year,” The Guardian reported late on Sunday.

According to Asheley Landrum, who led the research at Texas Tech University, identified the prime driver for the startling rise in the number of Flat-believers.

A poll conducted by London-based market research company YouGov in 2018 found only two-thirds of young people surveyed, “firmly believed” that the Earth was round.

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However, Google-owned YouTube is now contributing to people believing the Earth is round. Pixababy

“Of the 30 people, one said they had not considered the Earth to be flat two years ago but changed their minds after watching videos promoting conspiracy theories on YouTube,” Landrum was quoted as saying by The Guardian.

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Meanwhile, Google has acknowledged there’s more it can do to combat the spread of false information on YouTube. In January, it outlined new plans designed to push back the false belief, according to the CNET.

The YouTube team in a blog post said: “We’ll begin reducing recommendations of borderline content and content that could misinform users in harmful ways — such as videos promoting a phony miracle cure for a serious illness, claiming the earth is flat, or making blatantly false claims about historic events like 9/11.” (IANS)