Friday August 23, 2019
Home Lead Story YouTube Fined...

YouTube Fined in Millions Over Kids’ Data Privacy Breach

To combat such repetitive issues, especially involving kids’ privacy, the platform is considering putting all the content for children on the YouTube Kids app that was launched in 2015

0
//
youtube, virtual makeup
FILE - Silhouettes are seen in front of a Youtube logo, in this picture illustration taken in Zenica, Oct. 29, 2014. VOA

Google has reportedly reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over alleged violations of children’s data privacy laws on its content sharing app YouTube.

The settlement comes after an FTC investigation found that Google improperly collected children’s data which is a breach of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, CNET reported on Friday.

However, the Department of Justice has yet to sign off on the details of the fine, hence the exact amount YouTube would lose in the settlement remains unknown.

Earlier in June it was reported that Google could face fines from a late-stage investigation by the federal government into YouTube’s handling of children’s videos, after which the platform said it was considering significant changes to protect its youngest content creators and viewers.

youtube
FILE – Signage is seen inside the YouTube Space LA offices in Los Angeles, California, Oct. 21, 2015. VOA

One of the US Senators, Ed Markey, had also sent a letter to the FTC asking the commission to “hold YouTube accountable for any illegal activity affecting children that the company may have committed”.

In addition to the already existing enquiries on YouTube, the Centre for Digital Democracy and the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood also approached the FTC suggesting penalties for the video streaming giant.

Also Read: Micro-blogging Platform Twitter to Soon Explain Why Certain Tweets are Unavailable

They recommended all children’s data be deleted, civil penalties, plus “a $100 million fund to be used to support the production of non-commercial, high-quality and diverse content for children”, the report noted.

To combat such repetitive issues, especially involving kids’ privacy, the platform is considering putting all the content for children on the YouTube Kids app that was launched in 2015. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Announces a New Initiative Called ‘Privacy Sandbox’ to Protect Users’ Privacy on Web

Recent studies have shown that when advertising is made less relevant by removing cookies, funding for publishers falls by 52 per cent on average

0
google, online tracking
A man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco, May 1, 2019. VOA

In a bid to protect users’ privacy as they open ads on the web, Google has announced a new initiative called “Privacy Sandbox” to develop a set of open standards to fundamentally enhance privacy on Internet.

Google said it will work with the web community to develop new standards that advance privacy, while continuing to support free access to content.

“Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve started sharing our preliminary ideas for a ‘Privacy Sandbox’ — a secure environment for personalization that also protects user privacy,” Justin Schuh, Director, Chrome Engineering, said in a blog post on Thursday.

The company also aims to ensure that ads continue to be relevant for users, but their personal data shared with websites and advertisers would be minimized by anonymously aggregating user information, and keeping much more user information on-device only.

According to the company, large scale blocking of cookies undermine people’s privacy by encouraging opaque techniques such as “fingerprinting”.

privacy, google
FILE -Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the keynote address of the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., May 7, 2019. VOA

With “fingerprinting”, developers have found ways to use information that vary between users — such as what device they have or what fonts they have installed to generate a unique identifier which can then be used to match a user across websites.

“Unlike cookies, users cannot clear their fingerprint, and therefore cannot control how their information is collected. We think this subverts user choice and is wrong,” said Google.

However, blocking cookies without another way to deliver relevant ads significantly reduces publishers’ primary means of funding, which jeopardizes the future of the vibrant web.

Also Read: Top Investor of Tesla Wants Elon Musk to Step Down as CEO

Recent studies have shown that when advertising is made less relevant by removing cookies, funding for publishers falls by 52 per cent on average.

“So we are doing something different. We want to find a solution that both really protects user privacy and also helps content remain freely accessible on the web,” said Google, asking for feedback on this approach from the web platform community, including other browsers, publishers and their advertising partners. (IANS)