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YouTube to Invest $25mn in Countering Fake News

The "Top News" and "Breaking News" features have been launched in 17 countries, including in India

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YouTube
YouTube bans dangerous, harmful pranks. Pixabay

Google-owned video-sharing platform YouTube has announced it will invest $25 million to fight fake news — especially for the urgent coverage of breaking news — on its platform for over 1.8 billion monthly active users.

The investment will be part of the Google News Initiative (GNI), first introduced in March by the tech giant, to help the media and to deal with fake news.

“We’re establishing a working group with news organisations and experts from around the world to help us develop new product features, improve the news experience on YouTube and tackle emerging challenges,” said Neal Mohan, Chief Product Officer ay YouTube, in a blog post late on Monday.

“News organisations including Vox Media, Jovem Pan and India Today are early members of the working group. We’re looking forward to having more join as we convene the group in the coming weeks,” added Robert Kyncl, Chief Business Officer.

Beginning in the coming weeks, when YouTube users in the US search for videos on breaking news, they will see short excerpts of the news as well as the links to different media.

In addition, YouTube will provide links to Wikipedia or the Encyclopedia Britannica with controversial videos or conspiratorial issues such as the Moon landing.

YouTube
YouTube App on a smartphone. Pixabay

“We remain committed to working with the journalism community to build a more sustainable video ecosystem for news organisations,” the post read.

To make it easier to find quality news, YouTube has launched “Top News” shelf that highlights videos from news sources in search results.

When a breaking news event happens, another new feature called “Breaking News” shelf will highlight videos from news organisations about that event directly on the YouTube homepage.

Also Read: IGTV is Instagram’s Answer to YouTube

The “Top News” and “Breaking News” features have been launched in 17 countries, including in India.

Mohan and Kyncl admitted that “there is a lot of work to do”, but underlined that they will try to “provide a better experience to users who come to YouTube every day to learn more about what is happening in the world from a diversity of sources”.

“We will provide funding across approximately 20 global markets to support news organisations in building sustainable video operations,” the blog post added. (IANS)

Next Story

To Avoid Copyright Violations Youtubers Try Funny Ways to Make Videos

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now

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youtubers
Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner. Pixabay

In an attempt to combat copyright-related issues on YouTube, creators have started adding self-sung songs behind funny clips they wish to shoot a reaction video on.

Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen.

Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner.

“To work around that, creators like Danny Gonzalez and Kurtis Conner have started replacing the music with their own singing, half-heartedly singing famous songs while the corresponding TikTok video plays on screen,” The Verge reported on Sunday.

Youtube
Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen. Pixabay

Creators have devised the humorous method so that major labels would not be able to claim copyright infringement, or at least that the singing would not trigger YouTube’s automated system for finding copyrighted content.

ALSO READ: Motorola Fails to Cement its Position in India

However, the issue remains that YouTube content creators are still trying out ways to monetise videos that include content they did not create themselves.

“It’s a little painful to hear, but ultimately a very fun loophole in the copyright system that YouTube has to enforce,” the report added.

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now.  (IANS)