Monday January 27, 2020
Home Lead Story YouTube Under...

YouTube Under Fire on Twitter For Lifting Christmas Holiday Video

YouTube's community guidelines and policy page specifically states that creators should only "upload videos that you made or that you're authorised to use"

0
//
youtube
YouTube criticised on Twitter for lifting Christmas holiday video. Pixabay

Video-sharing giant YouTube came under fire on Twitter after it lifted and posted a Christmas holiday video of a professional domino artist named Lily Hevesh without giving her due credit.

The domino artist took to Twitter to express her disappointment. She said: “Very glad to see that my Christmas domino e-card is getting good use. However, I’m a bit disappointed that YouTube would take my video and re-upload it with absolutely no credit.”

“YouTube’s tweet doesn’t credit Hevesh at all, or mention her YouTube channel. The tweet also cuts Hevesh’s intro, which acts as a welcome to her channel for those who stumble upon the video.

“Hevesh’s original video, uploaded to YouTube on December 23, has just over 60,000 views, but YouTube’s lifted version boasts more than 250,000,” The Verge reported late on Wednesday.

Twitter CEO
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

“By stripping out the attribution to Hevesh when it brought the video to a broader audience, YouTube’s tweet — sent out to 71 million subscribers — prevents Hevesh from getting the recognition that might lead to jobs,” the report added.

The professional domino artist uses the video platform to advertise her work.

Also Read- OnePlus 5, 5T Start Getting Android Pie

YouTube, which faced a major backlash after the incident, in a follow up tweet recognised Hevesh’s channel and posted: “Our mistake – we forgot to credit @Hevesh5 for this video! Check out more of @Hevesh5’s epic domino art here: https://t.co/O7it1xtd5l.”

YouTube’s community guidelines and policy page specifically states that creators should only “upload videos that you made or that you’re authorised to use”. (IANS)

Next Story

Google to Test More Variations for Desktop Search Results

Google announces on Twitter to test more desktop Search design after backlash

0
Google
After facing backlash from its users, Google announced on Twitter that it will test more variations to the desktop search results. Pixabay

After facing backlash from its users, Google announced on Twitter that it will test more variations and changes to the desktop search results.

Last week, Google introduced a new design for desktop Search that adds site afavicons’ to every result which did not go well with users.

A ‘favicon’, also known as a shortcut icon, website icon, tab icon, URL icon, or bookmark icon, is a file containing one or more small icons, associated with a particular website or web page.

In a tweet, Google said it has heard the feedback from users.

Google
Google introduced a new design for desktop Search that adds site afavicons’ to every result which did not go well with users. Pixabay

“Last week we updated the look of Search on desktop to mirror what’s been on mobile for months. We’ve heard your feedback about the update. We always want to make Search better, so we’re going to experiment with new placements for favicons,” the tech company tweeted late Friday.

“Our experimenting will begin today. Over the coming weeks, while we test, some might not see favicons while some might see them in different placements as we look to bring a modern look to desktop Search,” Google added.

Not just SEOs and SEMs but a wider set of searchers and Google users criticized the desktop Search changes.

Also Read- Facebook Working to Re-elect Donald Trump, Says Billionaire Philanthropist Geroge Soros

“Our early tests of the design for desktop were positive. But we appreciate the feedback, the trust people place in Google, and we’re dedicated to improving the experience,” said Google.

“Web publishers have also told us they like having their brand iconography on the search results page. We are experimenting with a change to the current desktop favicons, and will continue to iterate on the design over time,” it added. (IANS)