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YouTube videos may not help toddlers learn new things

The toddlers preferred watching dance performances by multiple artists with melodic music, advertisements for products they used, and videos showing toys and balloons

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YouTube Logo. wikimedia commons
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  • Many videos may suggest that toddlers learn from Youtube videos
  • However, this might not be true
  • Toddlers are mostly attracted to music and dance videos

Do you let your toddler watch YouTube videos? It may not help them to learn new things, a study suggests.

The study results indicate that toddlers up to two years of age could be entertained and kept busy by their parents showing them YouTube clips on smartphones, but they may not learn anything from the videos.

Youtube may not help toddlers learn new things. Flickr
Youtube may not help toddlers learn new things. Flickr

“Young children are attracted to smartphones more than other forms of media and there is a need for more techno-behavioural studies on child-smartphone interaction,” said the lead author of the study, Savita Yadav from the Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology in New Delhi.

For the study, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, the researchers recruited 55 toddlers between 6 to 24 months old, using professional and personal contacts and visited by two observers, for at least 10 minutes.

Also Read: YouTube videos can now be watched on WhatsApp messenger

The observers recorded the toddlers’ abilities to interact with touchscreens and identify people in videos and noted what videos attracted them the most. The toddlers were attracted to music at six months of age and interested in watching the videos at 12 months.

Make your kids play outdoors to boost their eyesight
Toddlers are more attracted towards music and dance videos. wikimedia commons

They could identify their parents in videos at 12 months and themselves by 24 months. They started touching the screen at 18 months and could press the buttons that appeared on the screen, but did not understand their use.

The toddlers preferred watching dance performances by multiple artists with melodic music, advertisements for products they used, and videos showing toys and balloons. IANS

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How the Internet can help those who self-injure

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

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Internet
The Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere. Pixabay

Positive messaging through social media could be a powerful tool to help people overcome non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal Digital Health, suggested that those who engage in NSSI, the Internet can provide a less threatening and more anonymous information and support network, especially if individuals are not getting support elsewhere.

“Self-injury, including cutting and burning, is a serious public health concern around the world,” said lead author Stephen Lewis, Professor at Canada’s University of Guelph.

The researchers also found that while it affects people of all ages, self-injury is more prevalent among people from 14 to 24. Within that age range, up to one in five have engaged in self-injury.

“We know that young people who struggle with self-injury often go online to obtain needed social support,” said Lewis, adding that the stigma surrounding self-injury contributes to a strong sense of isolation.

Internet
Exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers measured how online comments about self-injury affected the attitudes about recovery in people who have engaged in self-injury.

The team embedded fictional peer comments in a screenshot of an NSSI-themed YouTube video and assessed attitudes about NSSI recovery before and after positive and negative messaging.

While there is growing concern that accessing NSSI content online may hinder recovery, the researcher found that exposure to positive comments improved participants’ attitudes about recovery.

They also found that exposure to pessimistic comments about recovery did not increase participants’ sense of hopelessness.

“NSSI is a complex concern, but many who self-injure experience very painful, intense and difficult emotions that are perceived as extremely difficult to tolerate and control,” Lewis said.

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“To this end, we see that the most common reason given for self-injury is to get relief from these adverse experiences, even if for a moment,” Lewis noted. (IANS)