Learning child and infant CPR could help save a little life

United States from sleep-related infant deaths such as suffocation, entrapment, strangulation, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
Learning child and infant CPR could help save a little life. Newswise
Learning child and infant CPR could help save a little life. Newswise

More than 23,000 children suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest annually. Although the reported number of infant out-of-hospital cardiac arrests varies widely, survival to hospital discharge averages 6.5% for children less than 1 year old who experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, unintentional choking and suffocation are a leading cause of all injury deaths for infants less than a year old. Nearly 3,500 infants die each year in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths such as suffocation, entrapment, strangulation and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Make safety a habit at home by implementing safe sleep practices, such as making sure babies sleep in their own crib or bassinet on a firm, flat surface without potential suffocation hazards such as blankets, stuffed animals or crib bumpers.

New parents, grandparents, babysitters and caregivers should take the time to learn infant- and child-specific CPR. It’s important to remember if the child is unresponsive, not breathing or only gasping, call 911 and start CPR immediately.

For a child age 1 or older:

For an infant less than 1 year of age:

If you have access to an AED (automated external defibrillator), use it as soon as possible. Most AEDs are equipped with child- and infant-sized pads. They can help guide CPR and provide treatment for certain heart arrhythmias. Continue compressions until emergency services arrives. Newswise

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