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Orphaned children in school work to support their family. VOA
  • ISIS declared a “caliphate” in Mosul in 2014
  • The children of many local residents who fought with the Islamic state fighters in the battle of Mosul were rendered homeless
  • They work in Mosul to support their families and can’t afford to consider the idea of going to school

New Delhi, August 25, 2017: A war on ISIS or the battle of Mosul, that left thousands of children in Mosul orphaned and homeless, manifests its influence even now. It could be seen in the form of helpless children, of the people who fought with the Islamic state fighters to take the city back from ISIS, when the terror group swept in Mosul, and declared a “caliphate” in 2014.

A number of Mosul children were orphaned during the war, leaving them with the responsibility of taking care of their families. Many can’t even consider going to school, since they are too busy in helping their families.


“I sell tissue papers to cover my daily expenses. My father can’t work because he is sick. I want to go to school but I can’t,” said Unis Tahir, a child in Mosul, as mentioned in the VOA report.

However, many others do not wish to go to school because they are afraid ISIS would teach them fighting and send them for the same.

“I did not go to school because ISIS came and they would teach children about fighting and send them to fight,” says 12-year-old Falah by his vegetable cart in Mosul, mentions the NDTV report.

ALSO READ: UN Human Rights Chief Urges Iraqi Government to help Victims of Islamic State (ISIS) Sex Abuse

The memories of the war still haunt the children. They are very much aware of their poor present, with no definite idea about their future.

“IS fighters suddenly came to our house. They dragged my father on the ground and killed him outside of the house,” said Nazim Ali, another Mosul child.

Right organizations say there are nearly 4000 orphan children in Mosul.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha


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