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(Representational Image) During a joint operation launched by Assam Police and Indian Army three Garo National Libertaion Army (GNLA) terrorists were apprehended identified as Cheg Cheng Marak, Lahen Marak and Singsi Rbat and recovered three pistols and some ammunition from their possession in Golapara district on 03-10-15. Image source: UB Photos
  • The attackers first hurled a grenade and then began to fire into the crowd
  • Four terrorists were on the run and an AK-56 rifle and grenades had been recovered from the spot
  • Assam Police chief Mukesh Sahay said he suspected the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (Songbijit) was behind the attack

At least 12 civilians were killed on Friday, August 5 when militants in military fatigues opened random fire at a busy market in Assam’s Kokrajhar town. Police said one of the raiders was also killed.

Witnesses said the attackers first hurled a grenade and then began to fire into the crowd, killing a dozen people and injuring 18 others in the town, about 220 km from Guwahati.



12 civilians and a militant killes in Assam. Image Source: ProKerala

Assam Police chief Mukesh Sahay told IANS that security forces shot dead one of the attackers. He said four terrorists were on the run and an AK-56 rifle and grenades had been recovered from the spot.

Sahay said he suspected the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (Songbijit) was behind the attack.

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Home Minister Rajnath Singh said in New Delhi that he spoke on the telephone to Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal and that the central government was closely monitoring the situation.


Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju. Image Source: PTI

Minister of State for Home Affairs Kiren Rijiju said the government was “very sad” to hear about killings.

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“We have to ascertain who exactly are behind this dastardly attack,” he said. (IANS)

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