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Street artist Lydia Emily Archibald, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012, touches up her mural aimed at raising awareness about the disease in Los Angeles. VOA

Australian researchers have made a breakthrough in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis using immunotherapy. Their world-first trial has produced promising results for the majority of patients enrolled, they said, including a reduction in fatigue and improvements in mobility and vision.

The treatment targets the Epstein-Barr virus in the brain that Australian researchers believe plays a role in the development of Multiple Sclerosis, or MS, a disease of the central nervous system. Immune cells extracted from patients’ blood have been “trained” in a laboratory to recognize and destroy the virus.


“What happens in MS, there is an immune reaction going on in your brain that is represented as if that your immune system is attacking the brain cells,” said Rajiv Khanna, a professor at Queensland’s QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. “Once that happens, your normal function in the brain gets impaired. We are trying to develop a treatment that could actually, sort of, make the immune system to work properly rather than going in the wrong direction.”


A researcher takes a tissue sample from a human brain at the Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s UK Tissue Bank, at Imperial College London, Britain June 3, 2016. An appendix, often considered useless, seems to store an abnormal protein, which if it makes its way into the brain, has been found to become a hallmark of Parkinson’s. VOA

Researchers hope the treatment could stop the progression of MS. They say the trial is significant because they have shown the technique is safe and has had positive improvements in an autoimmune disease.

Seven of the 10 participants in the Queensland trial have reported positive changes, including Louise Remmerswaal, a mother from Queensland.

“Ever since the trial, it has just improved so much that now I can go out and spend time with my family and friends,” she said.

Also Read: Australia’s Great Barrier Reef To Get Help From Rescue Bot

Further research is planned in Australia and the United States.

The new therapy is developed by the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane and the University of Queensland.

The results of the clinical trial have been published in the peer-reviewed journal, JCI Insight. (VOA)


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This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, which cause COVID-19.

A cheap antidepressant reduced the need for hospitalization among high-risk adults with COVID-19 in a study that was looking for existing drugs that could be repurposed to treat coronavirus.

Researchers tested the pill used for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder because it was known to reduce inflammation and looked promising in smaller studies.

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Even one of the world's most powerful tech CEOs can forget to unmute himself during a video chat.

Even one of the world's most powerful tech CEOs can forget to unmute himself during a video chat. For Alphabet and Google CEO Sundar Pichai, one such embarrassing moment came as he began the chat with Kermit The Frog, a character from Muppets, on Google Meet recently. Sharing the two-minute video clip on Twitter on Wednesday, Pichai said: "Always remember to unmute thanks @KermitTheFrog for joining us on @YouTube #DearEarth and chatting about some of our shared interests."

The video was part of YouTube's "Dear Earth" series which aims to address climate challenges. "Hi there, Sundar," said Kermit, a Muppet character created in 1955, to which, Pichai replied but he was inaudible as he was on mute. "Sundar, I think you are on mute. Wow, can't believe I am talking to the CEO of Google, and he is on mute," Kermit said.

At that point, Pichai realised he was on mute. "Sorry, Kermit. I was on mute, and I've done it a few times this year like everyone else. I'm a huge fan of you and the muppets," replied the Google CEO. The video chat went smooth after the opening glitch, and Kermit The Frog and Pichai spoke about climate issues the world is grappling with. (IANS/ MBI)


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Photo by Timon Studler on Unsplash

The research, published in the journal Psychological Science, showed that moral views concerning both recreational drugs and openness to non-committed sex are approximately 50 per cent heritable

A person's disapproval of noncommittal sex and their condemnation of recreational drug use may have a common genetic basis, suggests a study. The research, published in the journal Psychological Science, showed that moral views concerning both recreational drugs and openness to non-committed sex are approximately 50 per cent heritable, with the remaining 50 per cent explained by the unique environment.

Furthermore, approximately 75 per cent of the relationship between openness to non-committed sex and moral views concerning recreational drugs was explained by genetic effects, and the remainder was explained by the unique environment. "People adopt behaviours and attitudes, including certain moral views, that are advantageous to their own interests," said lead author Annika Karinen, a researcher at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

water droplets on glass during daytime A person's disapproval of noncommittal sex and their condemnation of recreational drug use may have a common genetic basis, suggests a study. | Photo by Braňo on Unsplash

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