Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
The 45-year-old Hussey, however, praised the bio-bubble in the IPL saying it is quite like what they experienced in Australia during the summer. Wikimedia commons

Several Australian cricketers are looking to leave the Indian Premier League (IPL) due to fears that they will be locked of their country following rising Covid-19 cases in India. Australia pace bowler Andrew Tye left his franchise Rajasthan Royals (RR) for ‘personal reasons, it came to light on Sunday, after fellow RR player England’s Liam Livingstone had left a few days back citing ‘bubble fatigue’.

The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) on Monday reported that many Australian players are ‘nervous about securing safe passage back home after the [Scott] Morrison government (Australian government) reduced the number of incoming passengers allowed from India’.India is enduring a tough phase in the pandemic, with around 3.5 lakh daily Covid-19 cases and inadequate medical facilities. Sunday saw 3.54 lakh new cases with over 2800 deaths.


Follow NewsGram on Facebook to stay updated.

“Several sources close to the situation said on Sunday that multiple Australian players in India were seeking to leave the tournament early amid India’s skyrocketing coronavirus cases and recent travel restrictions imposed on people returning to Australia from India,” said the report in SMH.


Josh Hazlewood , Mitch Marsh, and Josh Philippe had already withdrawn from IPL prior to the start of the tournament. Wikimedia commons

The report quoted Kolkata Knight Riders mentor David Hussey, a former Aussie batsman, as saying, “Everyone’s sort of a bit nervous about whether they can get back into Australia. I dare say there’ll be a few other Australians (besides Tye) a bit nervous about getting back into Australia.”Everyone’s pretty nervous about what’s going on over here, but they’re also pragmatic,” Hussey added.

“A couple of [Indian] players, their fathers have passed away. One person, in particular, he’s one of the staff members with us and his father passed away last year from Covid, and he was really pragmatic by saying it was his time to go,” he said. The 45-year-old Hussey, however, praised the bio-bubble in the IPL saying it is quite like what they experienced in Australia during the summer.

ALSO READ: All About Sakariya: From Struggling To Meet Cricket Expenses To IPL Stardom

“We’re stuck in bubbles. It’s probably not too dissimilar to what all Victorians experienced last year in lockdown really,” Hussey told SMH.”You get tested every second day. So it’s quite full-on but I think every precaution’s been taken for everyone’s safety,” added Hussey”It is on the radar. It’s on the news every minute of the day. You see people in hospital beds. It puts a lot of things in perspective.”

Steve Smith (Delhi Capitals), David Warner (SunRisers Hyderabad), Pat Cummins (Kolkata Knight Riders), Glenn Maxwell (Royal Challengers Bangalore) are among the 17 Aussies taking part in the IPL. Tye’s departure has left 16 Aussies in the league. Josh Hazlewood (Chennai Super Kings), Mitch Marsh (Sunrisers Hyderabad), and Josh Philippe (Royal Challengers Bangalore) had already withdrawn from IPL prior to the start of the tournament. (IANS/JC)


Popular

ANI

"When India grows, the world grows. When India reforms, the world transforms.": PM Modi

Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed the 76th United Nations General Assembly on Saturday held in New York. Prime Minister Modi touched on various issues ranging from making nasal vaccines in India to making an indirect remark on Pakistan for using terrorism as a political tool. PM Modi also highlighted how India is the mother of all democracies and how strategically and effectively India has managed the Covid-19 pandemic. He made comments on the developments in Afghanistan and poverty alleviation.

India: Mother of democracy

In his address at the UNGA session, PM Modi said that for the last one and a half years the world has been facing the biggest global epidemic of the century. He further added that he represents the mother of all democracies, where there are dozens of languages, hundreds of dialects, and different lifestyles and cuisines. India is a shining example of a vibrant democracy and it is recognized for its diversity.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Vasily Koloda on Unsplash

To be successful in life, one must have a degree in addition to the necessary skills.

"Better degrees don't automatically translate into better skills and better jobs and better lives."
-Andreas Schleicher


All of us at one stage of our life get confused between preferences, i.e., whether one should gain skills or pursue more degrees, degree and skill may be seen as two sides of the same coin. To be successful in life, one must have a degree in addition to the necessary skills. A degree without skills is as meaningless as skills without a degree. One can say that a degree gives you a direction to gain skills in the relevant field to become a master in a particular stream. In addition to that, a degree gets you where you want to be, but skills keep you there and help you go forward in your career.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal.

"In India, to be born as a man is a crime, to question a woman is an atrocious crime, and this all because of those women who keep suppressing men in the name of feminism."

Feminism, a worldwide movement that started to establish, define and defend equal rights for women in all sections- economically, politically, and socially. India, being a patriarchal society gives a gender advantage to the men in the society thus, Indian feminists sought to fight against the culture-specific issue for women in India. Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal. It states nowhere that women should get more wages than men, that women deserve more respect than men, that's pseudo-feminism.

Keep reading... Show less