Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Bangladeshi citizen protesting against ISIS Image Source: todayonline.com
  • Although Islamic State has taken responsibility for some recent killings in the past, officials have continuously denied the presence of the group
  • A similar incident took place, in which a 70-year-old Hindu priest was killed
  • Police have not been successful at making any arrests yet

Unidentified assailants have shot to death another Hindu priest today at a temple in Bangladesh, confirmed police and senior administration.

Shaymanonda Das, 45, was brutally killed in front of a temple in Jhenaidah district headquarters, located 300 km south-west from the country’s capital Dhaka.


Mahbubur Rahman, the chief of Jhenaidah district administration said, “He was preparing morning prayers with flowers at the temple early in the morning and that time three young people came by a motorbike and killed him with machetes and fled away.”

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @NewsGram1

Talking about the further investigation to Reuters, he added, “The nature of killing was similar with the local militants, but we cannot say more at the moment,” quoted India Today.

Relative console Shefali Ganguly, wife of Anando Gopal Ganguly, Image Source: bbc.com

Although Islamic State has taken responsibility for some recent killings in the past, officials have continuously denied the presence of the group, alleging that home-grown groups are behind the recent killings.

While the motive behind the shooting is still not known, the police have been unsuccessful in making any arrest so far.

Earlier, on June 7 a similar incident took place, in which a 70-year-old Hindu priest was killed, when he was riding a bicycle to Naldanga Bazar to perform puja, reported The Hindu.

Ananda Gopal Ganguly was attacked by three men who came on a motorcycle carrying sharp arms.

Later, his body was found in a rice field by some farmers near his village. The Islamic terror group then took responsibility for the attack.

Follow NewsGram on facebook: NewsGram

Apparently, Bangladesh has witnessed a spike in suspected Islamist attacks in the last two years. Its victims have primarily been bloggers, online activists, secular intellectuals, and members of religious minorities.

Previously, Amnesty International has also demanded a thorough and impartial investigation into these gory incidents and proclaimed that the government should “protect those still under threat.”

The group added, “In the current climate of impunity, increasing numbers of people have reported facing threats that the authorities have repeatedly failed to address.”

ALSO READ:


Popular

Unsplash

Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal.

"In India, to be born as a man is a crime, to question a woman is an atrocious crime, and this all because of those women who keep suppressing men in the name of feminism."

Feminism, a worldwide movement that started to establish, define and defend equal rights for women in all sections- economically, politically, and socially. India, being a patriarchal society gives a gender advantage to the men in the society thus, Indian feminists sought to fight against the culture-specific issue for women in India. Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal. It states nowhere that women should get more wages than men, that women deserve more respect than men, that's pseudo-feminism.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Yakshi statue by Kanayi Kunjiraman at Malampuzha garden, Kerala

Kerala is a land of many good things. It has an abundance of nature, culture, art, and food. It is also a place of legend and myth, and is known for its popular folklore, the legend of Yakshi. This is not a popular tale outside the state, but it is common knowledge for travellers, especially those who fare through forests at night.

The legend of the yakshi is believed to be India's equivalent of the Romanian Dracula, except of course, the Yakshi is a female. Many Malayalis believe that the Yakshi wears a white saree and had long hair. She has a particular fragrance, which is believed to be the fragrance of the Indian devil-tree flowers. She seduces travellers with her beauty, and kills them brutally.

Keep Reading Show less
Pinterest

Ancient India not only made mentions of homosexuality but accepted it as well.


The LGBTQ+ acronym stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and others. In India LGBTQ+ community also include a specific social group, part religious cult, and part caste: the Hijras. They are culturally defined either as "neither men nor women" or as men who become women by adopting women's dress and behavior. Section 377 of the India Penal code that criminalized all sexual acts "against the order of nature" i.e. engaging in oral sex or anal sex along with other homosexual activities were against the law, ripping homosexual people off of their basic human rights. Thus, the Indian Supreme Court ruled a portion of Section 377 unconstitutional on 6th September 2018.

Keep reading... Show less