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Rampur Hall of IIT (BHU) Varanasi, an example of Indo-Gothic architecture Image Source: Wikipedia Commons
  • BHU is going to play a major role in coordinating research projects on the Ganga pollution control and river basin management
  • Spread over 1,300 acres, the Banaras Hindu University started in 1916 on land donated by the then Kashi Naresh Prabhu Narayan Singh
  • It is the only institute in the world where courses ranging from nursery and primary school to post-doctoral studies are offered and studies

On the southern edge of Varanasi, near the banks of the river Ganges, Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya had envisioned an international residential institution that would become the pride of the nation. A hundred years later, the Banaras Hindu University (BHU) is excellence personified. With over 30,000 students and 3000 faculty members, BHU is one of the largest residential universities in Asia.

Now, the BHU’s executive council has decided to establish a research centre for Ganga river development and water resource management that will be named after the visionary founder. BHU is going to play a major role in coordinating research projects on the Ganga pollution control and river basin management under joint collaboration of the National Ganga River Basin Authority (NGRBA) and Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB).


Pollution at the ghats of Varanasi. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

According to the India today report, the university plans to enlist 100 scientists from various fields to develop environment-friendly technologies and harness their multi-disciplinary expertise to meet the present and future needs of water resource management and rejuvenation of rivers.

“We will make an extensive study of the stretch of the Ganga between Allahabad and Patna to collect authentic data of the sources of pollution for the formation of a viable and eco-friendly river basin management plan,” said BD Tripathi, noted environmentalist and chairman of the committee constituted recently by the vice-chancellor Lalji Singh to the Times of India.

Pollution at the ghats of Varanasi. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons


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Spread over 1,300 acres, the Banaras Hindu University started in 1916 on land donated by the then Kashi Naresh Prabhu Narayan Singh. India’s philosopher-president Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan was the vice-chancellor of the university for almost a decade, from 1939 to 1948. Now, BHU is organised into 6 institutes and 14 streams with 135 departments. It is the only institute in the world where courses ranging from nursery and primary school to post-doctoral studies are offered and studies.

Shri Vishwanath Mandir is the most prominent landmark and is located in the centre of the campus. The foundation for this 252 feet (77 m) high complex of seven temples was laid in March 1931 and took almost three decades to complete.Bharat Kala Bhavan the art and archaeological museum on the campus was established in January 1920 and had Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore as its first chairman.

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BHU has dedicated institutes highly specialised in the domains of agricultural sciences, medical sciences, environment and sustainable development and management studies. It also has a separate Sanskrit Vidya Dharm Vigyan Sankaya and faculty of Ayurveda. It has 15 specialised centres of study, including a Malaviya Centre for Human Values and Ethics which is aimed at inculcating humanistic values and ethics among students and teachers.

“We impart education based on a holistic approach that emphasises building of character and instils values. It is the confluence of Oriental Indian knowledge and modern scientific temper” ,says BHU vice-chancellor Girish Chandra Tripathi to the India today.

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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