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Corrupt Politics, Doctor Ed. Picardi Speaks Up, Louder Than Before, Flickr

Never Shy South Dakota resident Doctor Ed. Picardi speaks up. In fact, he’s as loud as ever.

Dr. Picardi was stripped of his license back in 2013 because he was ruffling feathers in Washington over the Hillary Care and ObamaCare disaster.


His was a lone voice in the wilderness as nobody was really prepared to go against the machinery of both administrations. The Clintons and Obama were at the zenith of their popularity when Dr. Picardi decided to take them on.

“I did what nobody in Washington did,” he recounts. “I actually read the entire HillaryCare bill, all 1368 pages. I did the same with ObamaCare.”

After reading through both laws, he quickly realized that they would perpetuate the wrong practices in the healthcare system and end up alienating those who really need medical help.


Hillary Clinton and Obama, flickr

“Abortion and decreased care for the elderly would result in an enormous number of unnecessary and preventable deaths,” he explains. “I believed it was my Hippocratic Oath and my Christian beliefs which necessitated me to bring out the truth about what was actually written in these bills.”

The drawback was that he became an attractive target by the “powerful politicians.” That got him a rude introduction into the pervasive corruption in government. In fact, a son of the senator filed trumped up charges against him.

He lost his license for three years before he was reinstated by the Nebraska Medical Board in 2016. That kind of trauma would have been enough to silence anybody.

But Dr. Picardi is not just anybody.

Finding strength in his faith in God and the support of his wife, Sandy, a cancer survivor, Dr. Picardi is at it again.

He says that President Donald Trump has a chance to make sweeping changes in the healthcare system of the country because he is an outsider.

“There are way too many career, life-long politicians in office who are willing to make decisions which help themselves to the detriment of this country,” he says.

Dr. Picardi particularly called out the weaponization of the country’s legal system and the IRS in the effort to silence dissent.

One classic example is that of David Daleiden, the founder of the Center for Medical Progress, who exposed the damning practice of selling aborted baby organs and body parts to medical schools to be studied.


Surgery tools, Flickr

Instead of being celebrated, he was charged with the purchase of human organs and tampering with public documents. His experience parallels that of Dr. Picardi whose only “mistake” was that he called out HillaryCare and ObamaCare as the wrong solutions to the country’s healthcare problem.

Also read:More friends improve brain health

“The weaponization of the judicial system and IRS, which even President Trump is now dealing with, is finally coming into the public view,” Dr. Picardi.


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