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Obesity now has become a major risk during the Covid19. Pixabay

New research adds to the growing body of evidence that the Covid-19 pandemic disproportionately affecting people with obesity around the globe. Obesity is an emerging independent risk factor for susceptibility to and severity of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2).

It is increasingly being recognized as a predisposing factor in Covid-19.


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After several studies found a strong link between Covid-19 and obesity, researchers wanted the effects of Covid-19 on the immune system and outcomes in critically ill patients with obesity.

The results of the study, which is scheduled to present at the 38th Annual Meeting of The Obesity Society (TOS) at Obesity Week Interactive, will take place from November 2-6, 2020. “This year’s program highlights the latest research on the impact of Covid-19 for people with obesity,” said study author Jaime Almandoz from UT Southwestern Medical Centre in the US.


The effects of Covid-19 on the immune system, outcomes in critically ill patients with obesity. Pixabay

“Covid-19 disproportionately affects people with obesity, who are at greater risk for complications and death,” Almandoz, co-chair of the TOS Program Planning Committee, added.

This study includes presentations covering the effects of Covid-19 on the immune system and outcomes in critically ill patients with obesity, in addition to the influence that the pandemic is having on eating, health behaviors, television watching, and telemedicine.

ALSO READ: Covid-19 Prevents The Formation Of New Red Blood Cells

Earlier, a study published in the journal ‘Endocrinology’, found that obesity may cause a hyperactive immune system response to the Covid-19 infection which makes it difficult to fight the virus.

Another study presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020) online conference, revealed that patients with obesity are facing more serious Covid-19 disease and higher mortality risk than patients without obesity. (IANS)


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