How To Make History Quizzes More Engaging Using QR Codes?

How To Make History Quizzes More Engaging Using QR Codes?

BY- Michael John

In 2019, Pew Research Centre reported that 95% of teenagers in the US own a smartphone. Although smartphones allow students to quickly access online information, studies have also shown that smartphones distract students from academic tasks and therefore, negatively affects students learning and knowledge.

Separating teens from their phones can be a challenging task. With this problem at hand, educators found a new way to encourage kids and teens to learn with the use of their mobile phones. One example is how the teachers are now using QR codes for their history quizzes, allowing students to access and save the questions by scanning a QR code with their mobile phones.

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What is a QR code? 

Quick response (QR) codes are two-dimensional barcodes that store high-density data, such as long text, website URL, and files. These stored data can be accessed by scanning the QR codes using smartphones. These QR codes can be scanned when printed or when displayed on digital media making it a flexible tool that can be used in the classroom.

How can you use QR codes for your History Quiz?

There are a lot of ways in which you can utilize QR code in your History classes and make learning more engaging for students. Through the help of a QR code generator online, create and display these QR codes all around the classroom and conduct a QR code hunt for your students.

Then let your students access interesting history content after scanning a QR code. Here are some strategies which you can use in creating QR codes for your History quiz.

  1. Let the students watch a short history video after scanning a QR code. Studies showed that educational videos tend to stimulate student's motivation in learning. Allow your students to experience a fun way of learning by incorporating videos on your quiz.

There are a lot of ways in which you can utilize QR code in your History classes and make learning more engaging for students. Pixabay

The QR technology not only embeds text on the QR code but videos and other files as well. To do one, you will need to use a video QR code that redirects your students to a short video that depicts the civil war. Then at the end of the video, post questions such as what caused the civil war or who were the people involved in the American civil war.

2. Instead of printing and displaying presidents' photos for your quiz, display QR codes that redirect to a photo instead. By using an image QR code, students will only be able to see the photos after they scan the QR code thus, preventing other students to prepare ahead. You can also type in questions on the photo and ask the students to identify who the president in the photo is and when was he inaugurated.

These photos can also be saved on mobile phones, allowing students to check their answers after the quiz and use these photos as review materials for future quizzes.

3. Add audio to your quiz. Another engaging way to use QR code on a history quiz is by incorporating audio questions on your QR code. Instead of reading some famous quotes from John F Kennedy, let your students hear the famous lines from the president himself. This way students will not just memorize the words but get to experience them as well.

 Conclusion

As digital technology rapidly develops, new and innovative ways should also be incorporated into children's education. Make the learning experience more engaging using QR technology. Use QR codes in your History quiz and display these QR codes in your classrooms.

Then conduct a hunt allowing students to access the questions by scanning the QR codes using their phones. These QR codes allow you to embed files such as photos, videos, and audio which you can also use in conducting a quiz using QR codes. Utilizing this incredible technology with the help of a QR code generator with a logo in your classroom can make learning fun for your students.

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