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The onset of a new season can be tricky; it can call for a change in routine, a revamped diet, and a new exercise regimen that suits the weather. Pixabay

As winter starts to give way to the spring, people struggle to keep pace with the seasonal transition and the potential health risks posed by the change.

The onset of a new season can be tricky; it can call for a change in routine, a revamped diet, and a new exercise regimen that suits the weather.


Dr. Hariprasad, Ayurveda Expert, The Himalaya Drug Company, shares five tips that will help you stay fit by avoiding diseases and ailments this summer.

ALSO READ: How govt can provide better healthcare system to more than 125 crore people in India


A natural way of staying hydrated is ample intake of fruits and vegetables that have high water content — oranges, watermelon, tomatoes, etc. Pixabay

1. Eat light and healthy

Your body will require a constant supply of water and fluids to sustain through the rough weather. Heavy meals with large amounts of carbohydrates and fats give rise to a lot of heat in the body. A natural way of staying hydrated is ample intake of fruits and vegetables that have high water content — oranges, watermelon, tomatoes, etc. This helps balance your core body temperature and keeps diseases at bay. It also helps hydrate the skin and keep it supple.


Natural fabrics such as cotton, silk, and linen are much better than synthetic fabrics. Pixabay

2. Gear up for summer

The Indian summer is known for its high temperatures and humidity, which can make you feel uncomfortable and stuffy. Wearing light and breathable fabrics is an effective way to beat the heat. Natural fabrics such as cotton, silk, and linen are much better than synthetic fabrics.


Wear clothes that enable your skin to be exposed to the sun. Pixabay

3. Embrace the radiance of the Sun

Post the shivers and heavy woolens of winter, the sun will finally invite you to bask in its warm glow. As sunlight is one of the best sources of Vitamin D, use this opportunity to exercise or eat outdoors in the morning. It is advisable to soak in the sun rays early in the morning, as this can be a great way of starting your day on a fresh and rejuvenating note.


According to Ayurveda texts and modern research, Tagara can calm the mind due to its sedative and sleep-enhancing properties. Pixabay

4. Ensure regular and undisturbed sleep

While air conditioners have reduced the discomfort significantly, sleep patterns can still take a hit in the hot, humid weather. Intake of natural herbs like Tagara can promote restful sleep.


Use one that contains ingredients like camphor oil, mint extracts, nutmeg oil, and turpentine oil, as they help provide quick, symptomatic relief from common cold. Pixabay

ALSO READ: WHO’s newly Elected Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus stresses on Health as Human Right

5. Be prepared for summer infections

Most people suffer from ailments such as common cold, sore throats, and viral infections in summer because of the heat and dust. While a preventive care approach is imperative, being prepared to face an unexpected disease is equally important. It is advisable to keep a cold balm as part of your first aid kit, as it eases the symptoms of common cold and is easy to carry around.

This quintessential health guide is easy to follow and will help you get ready for the long and warm summer. (IANS)


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