Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×



By Newsgram Staff Writer

Rashtriya Sawayamsevak Sangh (RSS) recently ended its Akhil Bharatiye Pratinidhi meet with a resolve to go beyond the caste divisions in the Hindu society, as these divisions have become very visible in the election of office-bearers to the top posts in the organizations, which was earlier a Brahmanical clique.

The sole OBC face is V Bhagaiah, from Medak, Telangana, who recently got elected as joint secretary of Sah Sarkaryavah, a third tier leadership. Bhagiah was earlier the head of Bhadhuik (intellectual wing of RSS) belongs to the Vadla community. Likewise, Sham Kumar, the regional head of the mid south region of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Telangana is also an OBC. Kumar who is brother of late Union Minister A Narender, is a pointer to the Sangh’s plan to expand in the south.

From its start Sangh’s top leadership has been considered a Brahmanical clique. It was in 1994 that Rajendra or Rajju Bhaiyya became the non-Brahmin Sarsanghchalak of the RSS.

“The symbolic value of these appointments is immense especially in view of the resolution taken to work towards ‘one well, one temple and one crematorium’,” said a senior office bearer of the Sangh.

Its backing for PM Narendra Modi as the BJP’s candidate in the last General Elections was seen as the first step towards a larger social democratisation of the Sangh Parivar. “Our real challenge, more than the integration of the OBCs is to integrate SC/STs,” said the office bearer. The Sangh’s expansion plans in the south (apart from Karnataka) have suffered largely because of the perception that it is a Brahmanical organisation, in a region where, historically, a strong anti-Brahmin movement has existed.


Popular

wikimedia commons

Tenali Raman, courtier to Krishnadevaraya (A portrait)


Tenali Ramakrishna, or Tenali Raman as he is more popularly known is Birbal's equivalent in South India. A court jester and a scholar exuding great wisdom, Tenali Raman was known as one of the greatest courtiers in King Krishnadevaraya's court.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Pixabay

Battle at Lanka as mentioned in the Ramayana

It must be noted that different religions and societies in Southeast Asia have alternative narratives of Ramayana, one of the greatest epic.

Here are some of the versions of Ramayana!

Keep Reading Show less
Virendra Singh Gosain, Hindustan Times

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people

When a baby is born in an Indian household-they invite hijra to shower the newborn with their blessings for their blessings confer fertility, prosperity, and long life on the child. But when that child grows up we teach them to avert their eyes when a group of hijras passes by, we pass on the behaviour of treating hijras as lesser humans to our children. Whenever a child raises a question related to gender identity or sexuality they are shushed down. We're taught to believe that anything "deviant" and outside of traditional cis-heteronormativity is something to be ashamed of. This mentality raises anxious, scared queer adults who're ashamed of their own identity, and adults who bully people for "queer behaviour".

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people. They worship the Hindu goddess of chastity and fertility, Bahuchara Mata. Most hijras, but not all, choose to undergo a castration ceremony known as "nirvana" in which they remove their male genitalia as an offering to their goddess. The whole community is vibrant with hundreds of people with hundreds of ways of expression, the true identity of a hijra is complex and unique to each individual. In India, hijras prefer to refer to themselves as Kinner/Kinnar as it means the mythological beings who excel at singing and dancing.

Keep reading... Show less