Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj addresses a press conference in New Delhi, India, June 19, 2016. Image source: AP
  • New Delhi has overcome resistance from several countries such as Mexico and Switzerland
  • China is not opposing India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group, but that it has raised objections relating to criteria and processes
  • With backup from US, India is lobbying hard before a key meeting in Seoul on June 23 to gain entry into the elite club

India is optimistic that China will not block its bid for membership of the Nuclear Supplier Group, the 48 countries controlling nuclear commerce and sensitive technology. With the backing of the United States, India has been lobbying hard before a key meeting in Seoul on June 23 to gain entry into the elite club.

In recent weeks, New Delhi has overcome resistance from several countries such as Mexico and Switzerland, but Beijing is on the frontline of a tiny group of countries that continue to express reservations about opening the NSG’s doors to India because it has not signed the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT).


Talking to reporters on Sunday, June 19, India’s foreign minister Sushma Swaraj appeared confident of overcoming Chinese resistance. “We are hopeful that we will be successful in getting China’s support,” she said.

Follow NewsGram on twitter: @NewsGram1

Swaraj told reporters that China is not opposing India’s entry into the Nuclear Suppliers Group, but that it has raised objections relating to criteria and processes. “In India’s case, instead of criteria, its credentials should be taken into account,” she said.


Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi arrives for a bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (not pictured) at the Nuclear Security Summit, Friday, April 1, 2016, in Washington. Image source: Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP

India’s top diplomat conveyed that message to China during an unexpected visit Saturday, June 18, to woo Beijing.

China has said that “large differences” remain over the issue of countries that have not signed the NPT joining the NSG.

But an optimistic Swaraj expressed hope that “consensus is being built and maybe no country will break this consensus and we will get membership of NSG.”

Some controls

Although New Delhi has not signed the NPT, it has committed to some controls on its nuclear program under a 2008 deal with the United States. That deal effectively ended the isolation imposed on India since a 1998 nuclear test and gave it access to nuclear fuel and technology.

Analysts say, India’s dream of getting membership of the elite club is more about gaining a seat at the nuclear high table as it seeks to raise its global profile than any actual benefits. They point out that New Delhi already has deals with more than eight countries either for supplies of uranium or for building power plants.

Follow NewsGram on facebook: NewsGram

Opponents say giving India membership will undermine efforts to prevent nuclear proliferation, which the NSG aims to do by restricting the sale of items that can be used to make arms. It will also infuriate arch-rival Pakistan, which has also made a bid for membership of the NSG.

Asked whether China was linking India’s membership of the nuclear group with that of Pakistan, Swaraj said that each country’s membership should be decided on merit. (VOA)

ALSO READ:


Popular

Unsplash

Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal.

"In India, to be born as a man is a crime, to question a woman is an atrocious crime, and this all because of those women who keep suppressing men in the name of feminism."

Feminism, a worldwide movement that started to establish, define and defend equal rights for women in all sections- economically, politically, and socially. India, being a patriarchal society gives a gender advantage to the men in the society thus, Indian feminists sought to fight against the culture-specific issue for women in India. Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal. It states nowhere that women should get more wages than men, that women deserve more respect than men, that's pseudo-feminism.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Yakshi statue by Kanayi Kunjiraman at Malampuzha garden, Kerala

Kerala is a land of many good things. It has an abundance of nature, culture, art, and food. It is also a place of legend and myth, and is known for its popular folklore, the legend of Yakshi. This is not a popular tale outside the state, but it is common knowledge for travellers, especially those who fare through forests at night.

The legend of the yakshi is believed to be India's equivalent of the Romanian Dracula, except of course, the Yakshi is a female. Many Malayalis believe that the Yakshi wears a white saree and had long hair. She has a particular fragrance, which is believed to be the fragrance of the Indian devil-tree flowers. She seduces travellers with her beauty, and kills them brutally.

Keep Reading Show less
Pinterest

Ancient India not only made mentions of homosexuality but accepted it as well.


The LGBTQ+ acronym stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and others. In India LGBTQ+ community also include a specific social group, part religious cult, and part caste: the Hijras. They are culturally defined either as "neither men nor women" or as men who become women by adopting women's dress and behavior. Section 377 of the India Penal code that criminalized all sexual acts "against the order of nature" i.e. engaging in oral sex or anal sex along with other homosexual activities were against the law, ripping homosexual people off of their basic human rights. Thus, the Indian Supreme Court ruled a portion of Section 377 unconstitutional on 6th September 2018.

Keep reading... Show less