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Students from various foreign abodes are fascinated by India’s culture but are deathly afraid of its roads and the traffic it pertains . Ayah and Nasraa both from Bahrain felt that there is not much difference in the culture of Bahrain and India maybe because of the fact that Bahrain is flooded with Indians . “Though we don’t have any Indian friends, we know a lot about Indian culture. Indian food is amazing too,” they said . The students are currently participating in the ‘Global Village’ of the annual cultural festival ‘Vibgyor’ of Baba Farid Group of Institutions which began today (January 29,2016).
However they added that travelling in India is a daunting experience which they wish to avoid. “Vehicles come towards you from all directions and the condition of roads is really bad. Travelling is a scary experience. The roads and traffic management is much better in Bahrain,” the 18-years-olds stated .
Naweed Hamkar from Afghanistan was reportedly well versed in Hindi phrases . “Aapse mil key khushi hui,” and “Dhanyawad” were some phrases uttered by him frequently at the feast. When asked about his extensive knowledge in hindi he said “Bollywood films are a huge hit in Afghanistan. All cinema goers are crazy about Hindi films and that’s also how I learnt little Hindi.”.
Twenty six-year-old Mahmoud from Egypt also unveiled his knowledge of Hindi language. “At the Azhar University where I am working as a technical support hand, there are courses in Urdu and Hindi languages. I pursued the course for a while and now I am using what I learnt at the university,” he said .
Alice was so entranced by Indian culture that she got mehendi applied on both her hands when she reached Chandigarh . “I am going to spend five weeks in India as part of the project and have decided to get to learn as much as I can about the Indian culture. I loved henna designs when I saw these and got the same done on my hands as well,” said the 20-year-old from Taiwan .
On the first day there were only 10 interns from seven diverse countries namely Ukraine, Brazil, Taiwan, Bahrain, Egypt, Afghanistan and Indonesia . All of them were adept in their knowledge of India .

The article originally appeared in The Tribune.



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