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Nuts like almonds are a source of 15 nutrients such as vitamin E, magnesium, protein, riboflavin, zinc, etc. PIxabay

Every year, May 15 is observed as International Day of Families. It celebrates the importance of families and aims to raise awareness of issues relating to families. The pandemic has put a pause on one’s family’s daily routine and has left many families with no option but to stay home. Schools have been closed, workplaces shut, and many parents and caretakers are home with their families. Keeping this in mind, the theme this year for the day has been kept as what the impact of new technologies has been on the well-being of families.

On the account of International Day of Families, we need to contribute to better health and well-being for our families and ourselves and take charge of everyone’s health by incorporating small yet impactful changes to our lifestyle. A good way to start this is by making informed food choices and snacking right. Nuts like almonds are a source of 15 nutrients such as vitamin E, magnesium, protein, riboflavin, zinc, etc.


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Leading Bollywood actress Soha Ali Khan said, “There is little doubt that the coronavirus pandemic has affected every aspect of our lives. No one knows how long this is going to last, but, as a mother, it’s important for me to protect and improve my family’s health. The first thing I would recommend is to start including healthy foods such as almonds to your own and your family’s daily diet. Beyond adding a host of nutrients to the diet, daily almond consumption may also help support immunity as they are high in copper and are a source of zinc, folate, and iron. Almonds are also high in Vitamin E, which acts as an anti-oxidant to support pulmonary immune function. Vitamin E is also known to offer protection against infections caused by viruses and bacteria. Besides this, in these grim times, it is imperative for the family to stick together and provide physical, emotional, and mental support to one another. Even a small gesture like having one meal a day together as a family, while sharing with each other highlights from school, college or work is a great way to stay connected and aid in each other’s well-being.”


Almonds are also high in Vitamin E, which acts as an anti-oxidant to support pulmonary immune function. Pixabay

Adding to this, Ritika Samaddar, Regional Head — Dietetics, Max Healthcare — Delhi, said, “Through the last year, it has been the families who have faced the brunt of the crisis, sheltering their members from harm, caring for children, and at the same time continuing work responsibilities. Families need to eat nutritiously and be physically active. A small yet impactful change would be to omit all unhealthy snacks from your and your family’s diet. To ensure this, you can plan on upturning your pantry, and replacing any unwholesome options with healthy foods like almonds.”

According to Madhuri Ruia, Pilates Expert and Diet and Nutrition Consultant, “I believe families need to treat their health as a priority — partners, parents, and children included. A family should strive and work together to care for one another — health-wise and nutrition-wise. For parents with a hectic work schedule and a family to look after, eating right should be a priority. You can rely on almonds as a great option to promote family wellness. Research indicates that almonds can help maintain healthy blood sugar levels and may lower the blood sugar impact of carbohydrate foods eaten in the same meal, which can be important for those with and without diabetes. Keep a handful of almonds around so that everyone always has a healthy snack handy.”

ALSO READ: Leveraging New Technologies Can Help Protect Families During Covid-19

Sheela Krishnaswamy, Nutrition and Wellness Consultant, “It is important for every family member, old or young, to take stock of their health amid today’s busy lifestyle. A convenient yet healthy thing that can be done is to add almonds to the family’s daily diet. This will have a positive impact, as research shows that almonds can help in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels, an important consideration given the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes in India.”

Fitness Expert and Celebrity Master Instructor, Yasmin Karachiwala, says her family’s health has always been a priority for her. “No matter how busy our lives get, compromising on fitness and a healthy lifestyle is never an option. Especially with our children, with restrictions in place, their outdoor activities are on hold, and snacking on processed, or oily food is at an all-time high. The consumption of this type of food can have side effects on their weight and growth in the long run. As parents, it’s important for us to keep an eye out for our child’s daily diet. Nuts such as almonds are a great replacement for unhealthy snacks as they may have satiating properties that promote feelings of fullness, which will help keep your kid full in between meals and limit their outreach for fried, unhealthy snacks.” This International Day of Families celebrates the joy of togetherness while taking a pledge to be healthier. (IANS/JC)


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