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Burqini. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Burkini- meets the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle
  • France’s recent ban on Burkini has raised questions on the adequacy of measures that need to be taken up to counter Islamic terrorism
  • Working towards stopping the Religious-Industrial complex from funding the proliferation of radical Islamism is the need of the hour to stop the rising terrorist groups

August 27, 2016: The Burkini ™ story starts, more or less, like this-

One fine morning, Ahida, the founder of the brand, was watching her niece struggling to play netball in a traditional hijab, which made her wonder about the necessity of a sporting garment suitable for a Muslim woman. In a eureka moment, she decided to supply the demands of modesty and flexibility by creating the trademark Burkini ™


The brand’s swimwear soon became a topic of media interest, which led to its exposure in different parts of Europe and Australia. The striking point which it emphasized was the ability to meet the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle.

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Recently, a french police had made a woman remove some of her clothing at the beach as part of the burkini ban imposed by the government in the wake of the recent terror attacks.

Nevertheless, this controversial ban is challenged by the Human Rights League and will be tried before the France’s highest administrative court. This brings us to the question of the hour- Does the Europe need to ban burqas to guarantee it’s safety? Here are two points, one should keep in mind:

I. Misinterpreting Islam– Today the anxious need to reassure the European population has driven many parts of Europe to take steps they wouldn’t have taken otherwise. The Muslim community has long been a part of Europe and showcasing them as a threat is doing more bad than good. Radical Islam and not Islam is the threat. Calls to jihad by refugees and not ladies adorning burkinis is the problem.

II. Petro-dollar as the source of Islamic extremism– Banning burqa or burkini (aesthetic aspects of a religion) seems more like a cosmetic solution to tackling Islamic terrorism. Closing borders or vetting people for cultural assimilation also are superficial measures. They create tensions and divisions.

The question here is, who funds Islamic terrorist groups? Who is behind spreading the Jehadi ideology?

Naturally, some filthy rich countries like Saudi Arabi, Kuwait and others are financing the spread of Wahhabi Islamic tentacles.

Suadi is using Petro-dollar to promote violence and unrest and spread of of fanatic Islam.

Working towards stopping this religious-industrial complexs in Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf regions from using their petrodollars to fund the proliferation of radical Islamism is the only effective way to solve the problem.

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So, we hear that Nice in France has banned burkini calling it “clothing that overtly manifests adherence to a religion”. Germany has proposed a ban on the veil in public places saying identification has now become a must.

Build the fortress, build the Berlin wall again!- but, measures that do not strike the roots of radicalism can never eliminate the threat!

– by Karishma Vanjani of NewsGram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots

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