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Srinagar, The Jammu and Kashmir Public Service Commission (JKPSC), an autonomous body tasked with recruiting gazetted officers in the state, is all set to use technology to cut the gestation period in selection processes and screenings.


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According to Commission chairman Latief-uz-Zaman Deva, this is being done to overcome delays in selection processes due to age-old manual means of document checking and eligibility determination and repletion of the processes.


a one-time registration process of candidates has been introduced. Under this, the candidature remains alive once an aspirant registers for a job vacancy after completing the eligibility conditions. The candidate would continue to receive system generated job alerts through SMS or email till he or she attains the upper age limit or gets a job.

“The Commission has also proposed introduction of online submission and collection of application forms for the posts advertised.

This would considerably quicken the process of shortlisting and screening candidates, which otherwise would take months and even a year or so if the number of candidates applying was large. It would also reduce the overall gestation period of selections.

Further, admit cards and other communications would be sent to candidates through the electronic mode with the introduction of e-admit cards and e-summon letters. “This way, the old method of sending these through post, which would take weeks to reach the candidates, would be dispensed with,” the official stated.

The Commission might also conduct the various examinations online as is being done by recruiting agencies elsewhere to save time and pace up the process.

(IANS)


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