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Jain Mahavir Temple. Image source: www.pagalparrot.com
  • K.J Somaiya Centre for Studies in Jainism has announced opening of admissions to its Mumbai University accredited courses in Jainology
  • Jainism teaches one to believe in non-violence and hence achieve liberation of the soul
  • The courses will be conducted in English, Hindi, and Gujarati

K.J Somaiya part of the esteemed Somaiya Vidyavihar clan is now all set to introduce its Jainism program to students all over India. Jainism is the study of life that believes in harmlessness and renunciation. It teaches one to believe in non-violence and hence achieve the liberation of the soul. Many people confuse Jainism with Buddhism. Though both the ancient religions were originated in India and both of them emphasize on non-violence but unlike Buddhism, Jainism puts non-violence, as it’s very core value.

With about 4,200,000 Jains in India as per the 2001 census, the Jainism program will be popular amongst a large number of the Indian population. The introduction of a course to study India’s sixth largest religion will not only aid the Jain population but also help people understand Jainism in a grander light. The courses being offered are:


  1. Certificate course in Jainology (one year part-time)
  2. Diploma course in Jainology (one year part-time)
  3. Prakrit language courses (one year part-time)
  4. A by research (two years)
  5. H.D philosophy (minimum two years)
  6. Short-term courses (three months part time)

Keeping in mind the varied population of India, coming from different backgrounds and speaking different languages, K.J Somaiya conducts the above courses in English, Hindi, and Gujarati. The courses are made available for the 9-5 working strata of the society too as flexibility in timing is available.

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About Somaiya VidyaVihar:


K.J.Somaiya Centre for Buddhist Studies Logo. Image source: www.somaiya.edu

Somaiya VidyaVihar encompasses 34 institutions, with more than 35,000 students and 1,400 faculties. Its main campus is in Mumbai, but Somaiya Vidyavihar also operates six schools in rural India. It was founded by the Shri Karamshi Jethabhai Somaiya in 1959, to provide quality holistic education.

Somaiya Vidyavihar has always been a place with a purpose – making a positive difference in the quality of life of its students and the community. It is known as much for its science, technology, engineering, management, social sciences and commerce programs, as for its programs for academic studies in various faiths and cultures of India.

You can check out their website at www.somaiya.edu

Jainism in Mumbai:

Jain Temples, Jain trusts and big industries owned by Jains, proves that Jainism is thriving in Mumbai. Adding to that, there are prosperous Jain communities living in many areas in Mumbai. Godiji Parshwanath Temple, one of the oldest temples in Mumbai constructed in 1812 symbolizes the growth of this religion in the metropolitan city. Another example is Dakshin Bharat Jain Sabha, a religious and social service organisation which is headquartered in Maharashtra, India.

-by Karishma Vanjani, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @BladesnBoots

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