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Dutee Chand. Image Source : www.mid-day.com
  • Dutee ran 11:30 seconds in the women’s heats and ran 11:24 seconds in the Kazaksthan Meet
  • Resident of a small village in Odisha, Dutee had to face a lot of shortcomings on her way to success
  • In 2014, she had been dropped and banned from the Commonwealth Games because her testosterone levels were higher than the permissible level in women athletes

Dutee Chand created history on the women’s 100m racing track, when she qualified for the Rio Olympics, in Almaty. She became the first woman athlete of India to qualify for this event of the Olympics. The 20 year old athlete ran 11:30 seconds in the women’s heats and further bettered it when she ran 11:24 seconds in the Kazaksthan Meet. Last April, she had missed the Federation Cup in New Delhi, by one-hundredth of a second. Since then she has toiled day and night to reach where she is today.

Resident of a small village in Odisha, Dutee had to face a lot of shortcomings on her way to success. She not only overcame financial problems but she shattered the social construct that dares to ignore the women that want to pursue sports. She is an inspiration for all young athletes and women, all over India. In 2014, she had been dropped and banned from the Commonwealth Games because her testosterone levels were higher than the permissible level in women athletes. Last year, in 2015, she fought and won this case which served as her return ticket to her international career.


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P.T. Ush.ina. Image Source : www.speedstar

After qualifying for the Olympics, her elder sister was the first one to get a text message from her. She was so surprised that she could not believe it for a good few minutes. Finally, when she did, she was overjoyed and immediately informed her relatives, who in turn, would inform their parents. Her entire family celebrated her achievement.

Dutee had told DNA, she was glad that she had been able to live up to the expectations of her folks. They had prayed and prayed for her to qualify. She was grateful of her coach, N. Ramesh, who had spent tireless hours trying to improve her skills.

“I could qualify for the Olympics due to blessings of a lot of people. I want to thank Sports Authority of India, Sports Ministry, and Athletics Federation of India for their support. I will continue to work hard and hope to bring a medal for the country,” she had said to the dnaindia.com.

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An image of 2012 Olympic Games. Image Source : Wikimedia Commons.

After P.T. Usha, Dutee Chand is the second woman of Indian origin to take part in the women’s 100m race in Olympics. First woman to qualify in doing so because during Usha’s time there were no qualifying rounds held for the Olympic Games. Over all, till this day, 4 women athletes have taken part in the 100 m race of the Olympic sport, namely Nilima Ghosh, Mary D’Souza , P.T. Usha and Mary Leela Rao. Now, Dutee Chand will follow in their footsteps.

We are extremely proud of her efforts and her achievement and hope that she is successful in attaining her dream and bringing back an Olympic medal.

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