Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Microsoft launches Made for India Kaizala app.. VOA
  • Microsoft India on Wednesday officially launched ‘Kaizala — a ‘made for India’ app that has been designed for large group communications and work management
  • The app works even in remote locations with 2G optimization
  • Powered by Azure Cloud platform, ‘Kaizala’ would help organizations seamlessly communicate, collaborate and complete tasks and bring together desktop users and mobile-only users

New Delhi, July 26, 2017: To enable businesses to become more productive, Microsoft India on Wednesday officially launched ‘Kaizala — a ‘made for India’ app that has been designed for large group communications and work management, even for remote locations with 2G optimization.

Powered by Azure Cloud platform, ‘Kaizala’ would help organizations seamlessly communicate, collaborate and complete tasks and bring together desktop users and mobile-only users who may be within or outside their organizations.


The company also announced the launch of ‘Kaizala Pro’ — an enterprise version that allows organizations to have full administrative control of their groups.

‘Kaizala’ is available in India as a free download on iOS and Android phones. ‘Kaizala Pro’ is available for purchase at a list price of Rs 130 per user per month.

ALSO READ: “Museum of Yesterday” : New App Reveals Little-known History of Rio de Janeiro Port

“‘Kaizala’ brings together the two disparate worlds of mobile only messaging apps and a digitally integrated modern workplace. The product will make it possible for organizations to interact with everyone both within and outside, seamlessly and with rich content,” Anant Maheshwari, President, Microsoft India, told reporters here.

“It is different from Microsoft Teams in a way that it helps mobile-first people — be it partners, customers or users — connect with organizations seamlessly,” he added. Microsoft Teams is the chat-based workspace in Office 365.

The app users can simply get connected using their mobile phone numbers as their primary unique ID.

Using ‘Kaizala’, organizations can connect with their employees and the extended value chain.

“The product offers a simple and familiar chat interface and goes beyond to make everyone more productive using Surveys, Polls, Jobs, Meetings and other actions, right in your chats,” added Rajiv Kumar, Corporate Vice President, Office Product Group, Microsoft.

‘Kaizala’ has seen significant adoption among organizations such as YES Bank, Apollo Telemedicine, Republic TV, United Phosphorous Limited and Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan, who are currently piloting the solution for their internal teams.

Earlier in the day, NITI Ayog CEO Amitabh Kant said that the economic advisory body is an early adapter of the app.

“Delighted 2 launch Microsoft’s Kaizala – a safe, secure, mobile first App designed & developed in India. Niti was its first few adopters,” Kant tweeted.

In addition, the Andhra Pradesh government is one of the first government organisations to use ‘Kaizala’ for real-time governance.

More than 30 government departments and over 70,000 users in the state government are using ‘Kaizala’ for day-to-day work.

Both ‘Kaizala’ and ‘Kaizala Pro’ are integrated with Microsoft Office 365.

Kaizala is a product of Microsoft Garage, which focuses on experimental ideas and projects. (IANS)


Popular

Shubhro Jyoti Dey, Unsplash

A Hindu is not forced into a mental straitjacket.

By Maria Wirth

In my view the greatest thing about being a Hindu is that one can be an open-minded, ‘normal’ human being, who is given plenty of insights and tips from the Vedas and other ancient texts on how to refine one’s character, how to anchor one’s awareness in the present and how to ultimately realize one’s oneness with the Divine Presence that is inside us and in everything.

A Hindu is not forced into a mental straitjacket. He does not need to think certain thoughts, which are against common sense and which are divisive, like for example the dogma of Christianity and Islam that “we alone have the full or final truth, and the Almighty will make all those, who do not accept this ‘truth’ and convert to ‘our only true’ religion, suffer in hellfire forever.

A Hindu has his conscience and the insights of the ancient Rishis as his guide.

In contrast, a Christian or Muslim has to suspend his conscience if it contradicts what his religion demands from him. This is a very serious point. The Jihadis for example might otherwise be kind youth, who would not kill people of other religions, if they had not been taught that it is their religious “duty” to ‘make the whole world for Allah’.

Keep Reading Show less

Cross

By Maria Wirth

This is a true story about a Hindu who had converted to Christianity, and who felt the need to convince his family also to convert.

Once on a flight from Germany to India, one of those bright, young Indians sat across the aisle. We started talking. He was a science lecturer at an American university.

Keep Reading Show less
Markus Spiske, Unsplash

A behavior-centric approach based on a human-centric viewpoint on cybersecurity

By- Laxman Balagani

Remote working has grown to be a dominant trend in the post-pandemic world. Gartner anticipates that 41% of employees will work at least some of the time remotely once the coronavirus is in the rear-view mirror. Such a lasting change in the workplace culture has had the biggest impact on cybersecurity.

Keep reading... Show less