Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
A woman holding her baby in a nursery watches another newborn who is attached to a ventilator at Juba Teaching Hospital in Juba, April 3, 2013. South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. VOA

More than 60 people graduated in Juba this week with diplomas in midwifery and nursing. Their goal? To reduce South Sudan’s high rate of maternal mortality.

Eight men were among the 66 graduates of the Kajo Keji Health Science Institute — an unusual occurrence in South Sudan, where midwifery is associated almost exclusively with women.


Samuel Ladu Morish, 26, says he felt he could no longer sit by and watch young women die because of childbirth.


A woman sits inside a mosquito tent in the town of Abyei, Sudan. VOA

“A lot of mothers are dying so [for] me particularly it pains me. That is why I felt I have to do that course, to try my level best to stop maternal mortality rate in South Sudan,” Morish told VOA’s South Sudan in Focus.

Twenty-one-year-old Leju Henry, another male graduate, said he’s been asked many times why he decided to pursue a course in midwifery. Like Morish, Henry said he wants to help South Sudanese women, especially those who suffer complications in child labor.

“Most people think midwifery is a job for females only, but that is not the truth. … the definition of midwifery [is] that a midwife simply means someone who assists in child above all, but not necessarily means a fellow woman,” Henry said.

According to figures published by the World Health Organization in 2017, South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world — 789 women per 100,000 live births.


In this photo taken Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018, the winner of Miss World South Sudan 2017, Arual Longar, poses for a portrait at a shelter for street children in Juba, South Sudan. VOA

The rate has actually fallen in recent years, a trend that Makur Koriom, the undersecretary of South Sudan’s Ministry of Health, attributes to increased training of midwives and nurses.

Also Read: Sudan Suffers From A Chikungunya Outbreak

He says South Sudan has added more than 800 midwives and nurses since 2010.

“We believe that’s important, because to address the current health challenges, investing in human resource is very important. But, of course, investment at [the] secondary level without concurrent development at the community level also will not yield [good results], because most of the issues happen at the community level,” Koriom told VOA. (VOA)


Popular

Unsplash

Meta-owned WhatsApp on Monday announced an incubator programme in India.

Meta-owned WhatsApp on Monday announced an incubator programme in India that will select 10 organisations and help them build digital solutions to tackle critical health issues.

Called the WhatsApp Incubator Programme (WIP), the initiative aims to facilitate positive and measurable health outcomes at scale by leveraging the WhatsApp Business Platform.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

India has to define its stand and negotiate its international policy keeping in view the nation's best interests of the long run.

By D.C. Pathak

Advent of Biden Presidency with its resonating calls of 'America is back', 'we will repair our alliances' and 'will engage with the world once again' on one hand and the rise of President Xi Jinping with a stronger hold on China after the Plenary session of the 19th Central Committee of CPC, on the other, have got strategic analysts to examine if a new Cold War was already on the horizon.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Digital becomes more popular and companies expand their D2C (direct-to-consumer) connections

Smartphone companies which have strong consumer pull now face most of the reputation issues caused by infringement of their brands in the digital space, according to a new report.

There are three main techniques pertaining to brand infringement —fake gratification, fake presence and fake representation.

According to Faisal Kawoosa, founder and chief analyst, Techarc, as digital becomes mainstream and brands increase their D2C (direct-to-consumer) engagements, they need to proactively police the digital space to hunt for any infringement cases.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

"The first thing brands need to do is to come out of denial mode and create a common synergy between marketing, ecommerce, IT and digital teams," he said in the Brand Reputation Index (BRIX) report.

In fake gratification, scammers infringe any brand's identity by offering fake coupons, rewards, schemes, and discounts. This is the easiest trap for consumers who are searching for best deals when they decide about buying a smartphone of their interest.

Keep reading... Show less