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(150411) -- TURBAT, April 11, 2015 (Xinhua) -- Photo released by Press Information Department (PID) on April 11, 2015 shows Chief Minister Balochistan Dr. Abdul Malik Baloch (C, in blue) and other government officials carrying the body of a construction worker who was killed in an attack by gunmen in Turbat district in southwestern Baluchistan province, Pakistan. At least 20 laborers were killed and three others injured when some unknown gunmen opened fire at a camp in Pakistan's southwest Turbat district in the wee hours of Saturday morning, officials said. (Xinhua/PID) (lrz)



Islamabad: A group of unknown militants on Friday night killed at least 20 passengers after kidnapping them in Pakistan’s south-western province of Balochistan, a media report said.

The incident took place when unknown militants stopped two buses and kidnapped 35 passengers in Mastung district of the province, Xinhua reported.

Soon after the incident, security forces rushed to the site.

The militants killed 20 of the abducted passengers after security forces chased them and exchanged fire, said Sarfaraz Bugti, interior minister of the province.

He added that security forces rescued six of the abducted passengers and are following the militants to rescue the other passengers.

The buses were headed towards the country’s southern port city of Karachi from the provincial capital of Quetta.

Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif directed the authorities to rescue the remaining passengers safely.

No group has claimed responsibility for the incident as yet.

-IANS


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