Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Mohammad Shafi Armar(alias Yousuf al-Hindi) Image source: Benarnews

Indian intelligence officials said Monday they were working to verify reports that the alleged head of an Islamic State cell and principal recruiter for IS in India had been killed in a U.S. airstrike in Syria.

Mohammad Shafi Armar (alias Yousuf al-Hindi), who comes from the south Indian state of Karnataka, was killed in a drone strike “a few days ago,” according to a report published by the Times of India on Monday that cited top government sources.


An official at India’s Intelligence Bureau (IB) told BenarNews that although it had received an intelligence report of Armar’s death from American intelligence officials on Sunday, the bureau was cross-checking to verify the information.

“Prima facie, it seems he [Armar] is dead. But we can’t say anything for sure until we verify [the information],” said the official who requested anonymity.

“The confirmation process may take some time because getting information from Syria, which is an IS stronghold, is not easy,” the official added.

Common link

Armar, 26 (pictured below), is believed to be the common link among at least 25 people arrested by Indian security agencies over the past year for showing leanings toward the Middle East-based terror outfit, according to intelligence sources.

The Times of India claimed to have confirmed the information about his death from three top government and intelligence sources.

The alleged IS sympathizers told investigators during interrogation that they were radicalized and recruited by Armar through online platforms such as Facebook, WhatsApp and Skype, sources in the National Investigation Agency (NIA) told BenarNews.

Armar allegedly took over the reins of IS’s India offshoot – Ansar ul-Tawhid (AuT) – after his brother, Abdul Khadir Sultan Armar, 38, was killed in an airstrike in Kobane, Syria, in March 2015.

Armar recently dismantled AuT and renamed it as Junud al Khalifa-e-Hind, which translates to “soldiers of the Indian caliphate,” with an aim to establish an IS unit in every Indian state, according to intelligence agencies.

Following the death of Armar’s brother last year, their mother, Hajira, told The Indian Express that her sons had stopped communicating with her in 2010, five years after the brothers left for Oman.

A police official in Bhatkal, the Armar family’s hometown about 525 km (326 miles) from the Karnataka capital Bengaluru, told BenarNews that Armar’s mother and father, Shabbir Hussain, had relocated to Dubai within the past year. BenarNews was unable to locate Armar’s parents for comment.

A total of 23 Indians have left India to fight for the IS in Iraq and Syria, according to an intelligence report released last year. Of them, six had died in battle before reports of Armar’s death emerged.

While at least 25 suspected IS recruits have been arrested by Indian security forces, more than 150 are under surveillance for showing sympathy toward the militant organization, according to officials. (Benar News)


Popular

Photo by Valeriia Kogan on Unsplash

Colorless chemicals were developed and mixed in varying ratios to dye hair.

A couple of years ago, finding a strand of grey hair meant visiting the parlor to cover it up. Women and men refused to admit their age, and refused to let it show. Be it moustache, eyebrows, or hair on the head, it was dyed a luscious black, or reddish-brown for those who wanted to go natural. Today, the trend of coloring hair has nothing to do with age. Young boys and girls sport bright colors and hairstyles, which is now a marker of how modern one can be.

This notion of modernity associated with neon streaks and an almost gothic look originates from the ancient Egyptian civilization, where it was considered fashionable to look different from the natural features one was born with. Kohl, lipstick, perfume, and makeup were the inventions of those who hoped to live even after death. Likewise, they were the first people to discover hair dye. Initially, they dyed their hair black, to cover the grey. They used compounds that were extracted from plants, but some of them were lethal. So, they took to extracting the color from fermented leeches.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Wikimedia Commons

One of the bookshop at Daryaganj, Chandni Chowk, Delhi.

The history of Daryaganj goes back to the era of Mughal dynasty, and so its history is as old as the old city of Shahjahanabad, now Chandni Chowk. Interestingly, this market was known as Faiz Bazaar in the Mughal era and was considered as an important commercial place.

In fact, at that time this area was very posh, and had beautiful houses on both sides of a stream from a hauz (meaning, water storage tank) flowing down the centre. Not only this, trees were lined up for shade and it looked like a marvellous garden had been turned into a market.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona on Unsplash

Numerous young people carry on involving themselves with social media without even bothering to consider its effect on them.

Social media is an umbrella term that encompasses all apps, websites, and blogs that allow people from all over the world to interact through the internet. Anyone who wishes to use any social media platform must first sign up and then sign in to view content and communicate with other members of that social media platform. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp, LinkedIn, and Snapchat are commonly used social media platforms. Social media, like all technological advancements, has both advantages and disadvantages.

Social media has become an essential aspect of life for many youths in today's society. Numerous young people carry on involving themselves with social media without even bothering to consider its effect on them. The consequences may be both good and bad at times. When it comes to the negative impact of social media on teenagers, the majority of the time, they are unfavourable if the activity is not linked with a commercial or professional objective.

Keep reading... Show less