Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Mumbai Attacks, 2008. Credits-www.deccanchronicle.com

Islamabad: Pakistan must admit its mistakes for allowing Pakistani terrorists to sail to Mumbai and carry out the horrific massacre in Mumbai in 2008, almost bringing Islamabad and Delhi to war, a former senior Pakistani official has said.


Mumbai Attacks, 2008. Credits-www.deccanchronicle.com

The revelation vindicates India’s stand that 99 percent of the evidence of the 26/11 attacks lies in Pakistan since the entire plotting was done in that country, sources said on Tuesday.


Tariq Khosa, a former director general of the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA), equivalent of India’s CBI, wrote in the Dawn newspaper that “Pakistan has to deal with the Mumbai mayhem, planned and launched from its soil”.

“This requires facing the truth and admitting mistakes,” he said, detailing the various Pakistani links to the terrorists who massacred 166 Indians and foreigners over three days in India’s financial capital.

“The entire state security apparatus must ensure that the perpetrators and masterminds of the ghastly terror attacks are brought to justice,” Khosa said, underlining that the case had lingered on for far too long.

“What’s new in what has been revealed?” a source told IANS. “This is what we have been saying all along, that the entire plotting and financing for 26/11 was done in Pakistan, and the prosecution there has 99 percent of the evidence, but they choose not to act on it.”

“What he (Khosa) has said vindicates our stand. India has been maintaining since 2008 that the entire plotting and financing was done in Pakistan,” the source added.

According to noted strategic expert Uday Bhaskar, the revelations by Khosa are an important statement in the public domain.

“The author is a former DG of the FIA and his observations are that of a seasoned senior professional from Pakistan’s premier investigating agency,” Bhaskar told IANS.

He said the most valuable parts of Khosa’s revelations “are the detailing of ‘facts’ pertinent to the case that have been unearthed or pieced together including the role of the LeT; the casings of explosives recovered from a training camp in Pakistan and matched with devices used in Mumbai; linking the number of the engine used on the dinghy with a Karachi sports shop; the money trail; the operations room etc.”

“Khosa and his team are to be commended both for their investigative diligence and his candor in bringing this to the public domain. One hopes that his personal safety will not be compromised due to such courage,” Bhaskar, director of think tank Society for Policy Studies, told IANS.

He said that while the facts were not new to the concerned Pakistani authorities, “it is unlikely that the Khosa disclosure will bring about a mea culpa transformation in the Rawalpindi-Muridke combine. The deep state in Pakistan is too deeply invested in support to certain terror groups and enabling 26/11 to reach its ethical conclusion will bring too many skeletons out into the open.”

In his article, Khosa said dilatory tactics by the defendants, frequent change of trial judges, and the assassination of the case prosecutor as well as retracting from original testimony by some key witnesses had proved to be serious setbacks for the prosecutors.

Ten Pakistani terrorists sneaked into Mumbai from the sea in November 2008 and carried out a massacre in a well-planned manner.

One of the terrorists, Ajmal Kasab, was caught, put on trial, and later hanged in India. Security forces killed the others. Islamabad initially denied any links with the attackers but later admitted that Kasab and the masterminds were Pakistani nationals.

Khosa pointed out that Kasab was a Pakistani and that the Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) terrorists who attacked Mumbai were trained near Thatta in Sindh and launched by sea from there.

“First, the training camp was identified and secured by the investigators. Second, the casings of the explosive devices used in Mumbai were recovered from this training camp and duly matched.

“Third, the fishing trawler used by the terrorists for hijacking an Indian trawler in which they sailed to Mumbai was brought back to harbor, then painted and concealed. It was recovered by the investigators and connected to the accused.

“Fourth, the engine of the dinghy abandoned by the terrorists near Mumbai harbor contained a patent number through which the investigators traced its import from Japan to Lahore and then to a Karachi sports shop from where an LeT-linked militant purchased it along with the dinghy. The money trail was followed and linked to the accused who was arrested.

“Fifth, the ops room in Karachi, from where the operation was directed, was also identified and secured by the investigators. The communications through Voice over Internet Protocol were unearthed.

“Sixth, the alleged commander and his deputies were identified and arrested. Seventh, a couple of foreign-based financiers and facilitators were arrested and brought to face trial,” Khosa said.

Khosa said the Mumbai case was unique, and that proving conspiracy in a different jurisdiction was more complex and required a far superior quality of evidence.

“Therefore, the legal experts from both sides need to sit together rather than sulk and point fingers.”

He asked: “Are we as a nation prepared to muster the courage to face uncomfortable truths and combat the demons of militancy that haunt our land?”

Khosa also flayed India for the “botched investigation” into the Samjhauta Express bombing and the alleged support to the Baloch insurgency as well as the terror financing in Karachi and Fata.

“They (India) too have many skeletons in their cupboards. So why fight shy?

“Let both India and Pakistan admit their mistakes and follies and learn to co-exist while trying to find solutions to their thorny issues through peaceful means.”

Khosa said the political and security leadership of Pakistan had resolved to eliminate the scourge of terrorism, militancy, and extremism.

“The duality and distinction between good and bad Taliban, including all militants and terrorists, should stand removed from Miramshah to Muridke, from Karachi to Quetta.”

(IANS)


Popular

IANS

The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Lina Trochez on Unsplash

Clean and maintained hands boost confidence in daily life activities.

If you feel that clean and well-groomed hands are just an essential prerequisite for women, you might like to think twice. Men should equally pay attention to their hands because our hand houses 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of its skin. You can easily assume what havoc it can create in our body because in India we have the culture of eating with our hands and spaces beneath nails can become breeding heaven for germs. Moreover, clean and maintained hands boost confidence in their daily life activities. Therefore, it's important to keep your hands clean irrespective of your gender by washing or sanitizing at regular intervals. And, to keep them groomed, you don't have to visit a salon.

Rajesh U Pandya, Managing Director, KAI India, gives easy and completely doable tips to follow at home:

* Refrain from harsh soaps: You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. Your soap can have a moisturizing element in it like aloe vera or shea butter. Ensure that you're washing your hands with normal water as hot water can make your hand's skin dry and scaly.

Soap bars organic You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. | Photo by Aurélia Dubois on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Dmitry Demidko on Unsplash

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds.

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds. The confidence generated in this cryptocurrency will depend a lot on the diversification that companies make in their balance sheets in Bitcoin and the increase of institutional investors that allocate a percentage of their funds in this crypto. American fund manager Cathie Wood makes some interesting predictions, both in the rise that the Bitcoin price will experience in the next 5 years, suggesting these institutional investors allocate 5% of their funds; this will help leverage the Bitcoin market.

Bitcoin will grow by a tenfold

Keep reading... Show less