Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a memorial service following the multiple police shootings in Dallas, Texas, July 12, 2016. Image source: Reuters

President Barack Obama honored five slain police officers during a memorial Tuesday in Dallas, saying the past week of violence has exposed “the deepest fault line of our democracy,” while also insisting that the nation is not as divided as some claim.

The president asked Americans to try to find common ground as he works to unite a nation deeply divided on the question of race relations between law enforcement and the minority communities they serve.


Last week’s attack on Dallas police by a black Army veteran who was angry over police killings of two black men in Louisiana and Minnesota intensified a national debate over racial bias in law enforcement.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

In remarks that ranged from the dedication of law enforcement officers to racial bias in America, Obama said he understood that people across Dallas and the country are suffering.

The president honored the five slain officers and called for unity and hope.

“I understand how Americans are feeling, but Dallas, I’m here to say we must reject such despair,” Obama said.

He urged the nation to speak “honestly and openly” about the current state of race relations, saying an overwhelming number of police officers is “worthy of our respect, not our scorn.”

Although race relations have improved dramatically in America in recent decades, he added, “America, we know bias remains, we know it.”

Five seats were left empty to represent each of the fallen officers during a crowded and emotional memorial at the Morton Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas.

‘Hatred and malice’

“They were peacemakers in blue; they have died for that cause,” proclaimed Mayor Mike Rawlings. “The soul of our city was pierced when police officers were ambushed in a cowardly attack.” He added, “Today must be about unity.”

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Vice President Joe Biden and Obama’s predecessor, former President George W. Bush, also attended the memorial.

Bush condemned the “hatred and malice” behind the attack and called for unity, hope, and tolerance in its wake. The former president urged Americans to “honor the images of God we see in one another.”

Before the memorial, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said that Obama believes America must both fully support police officers and acknowledge “the reality of racial disparities” that exist in America.

The White House said the president is interested in comforting people across the nation after emotionally charged events in recent days, including the separate shooting deaths in Baton Rouge and St. Paul.

From conversation to action

While traveling to Dallas, Obama telephoned the families of both men killed by police, Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, to offer condolences on behalf of the American people.

“These are legitimate concerns raised by all sides of the issues,” Earnest said. “The president is interested in trying to push that conversation into concrete action,” he added.

“The conversation is taking place in the context where it has often been painted, unfairly I think, as being hostile to law enforcement,” said Anderson Francois, Georgetown University School of Law. “But I think this conversation is an important one, and I think he’s the best person in the position to do it.”

The fatal shootings were captured on video and sparked protests across the nation, and charges that white police officers unfairly target minorities.

On Wednesday, Obama will meet with law enforcement officials, civil rights leaders, activists, academics and political leaders from across the country to discuss ways to restore trust in communities where tension exists between law enforcement officials and residents they are sworn to protect.

The sniper, Micah Johnson, killed the police officers during a rally by the Black Lives Matter, a grass-roots movement trying to pressure political leaders to take action on police brutality and criminal justice reform.

The president has strongly condemned the use of violence during demonstrations, but he has expressed sympathy for their cause.

“I think the president has been very, very clear on a number of occasions about his support for the Black Lives Matter movement,” Francois said. “Yes, there are times when he’s challenged their tactics, but at the end of the day, he’s always been very clear that he’s in support of the ultimate goal.”

Investigators are looking into Johnson’s background. The Army reserve veteran died when police used a robot armed with explosives against him.

“We’re convinced that this suspect had other plans, and thought that what he was doing was righteous and believed that he was going to target law enforcement, make us pay for what he saw as law enforcement’s efforts to punish people of color,” said Dallas police chief David Brown.

Bomb-making materials and a rambling journal were found at Johnson’s home during a search. (VOA)

ALSO READ:


Popular

wikimedia commons

Tenali Raman, courtier to Krishnadevaraya (A portrait)


Tenali Ramakrishna, or Tenali Raman as he is more popularly known is Birbal's equivalent in South India. A court jester and a scholar exuding great wisdom, Tenali Raman was known as one of the greatest courtiers in King Krishnadevaraya's court.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Pixabay

Battle at Lanka as mentioned in the Ramayana

It must be noted that different religions and societies in Southeast Asia have alternative narratives of Ramayana, one of the greatest epic.

Here are some of the versions of Ramayana!

Keep Reading Show less
Virendra Singh Gosain, Hindustan Times

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people

When a baby is born in an Indian household-they invite hijra to shower the newborn with their blessings for their blessings confer fertility, prosperity, and long life on the child. But when that child grows up we teach them to avert their eyes when a group of hijras passes by, we pass on the behaviour of treating hijras as lesser humans to our children. Whenever a child raises a question related to gender identity or sexuality they are shushed down. We're taught to believe that anything "deviant" and outside of traditional cis-heteronormativity is something to be ashamed of. This mentality raises anxious, scared queer adults who're ashamed of their own identity, and adults who bully people for "queer behaviour".

Hijras are a community of people who include eunuchs, intersex, and transgender people. They worship the Hindu goddess of chastity and fertility, Bahuchara Mata. Most hijras, but not all, choose to undergo a castration ceremony known as "nirvana" in which they remove their male genitalia as an offering to their goddess. The whole community is vibrant with hundreds of people with hundreds of ways of expression, the true identity of a hijra is complex and unique to each individual. In India, hijras prefer to refer to themselves as Kinner/Kinnar as it means the mythological beings who excel at singing and dancing.

Keep reading... Show less