Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
United States Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati addresses the media at a press conference introducing new US Men's National Team Head Coach Jurgen Klinsmann at NIKETOWN in New York, NY, on August 01, 2011.

Washington: US President Barack Obama singled out US Soccer Federation’s (USSF) Indian-American President Sunil Gulati as he welcomed the US women’s World Cup-winning champions into the White House.

“I want to recognize a lot of people who made these incredibly talented women and put them in a position to be able to showcase their talent so effectively,” he said Tuesday welcoming the team that overcame Japan 5-2 in a thrilling Canada 2015 Final in July


“First of all, US Soccer President Sunil Gulati. Please give him a big round of applause,” said Obama amid applause. He also praised the team’s “outstanding coach, Jill Ellis.”

Allahabad-born Gulati, 56, was unanimously re-elected to a record third four-year term as USSF president in March 2014.

A former president of Kraft Soccer for the New England Revolution in Major League Soccer, he is also a senior lecturer in the economics department of Columbia University.

“These champions deserve all the attention that they’ve been getting. After 16 long years, too many heartbreaks, they flew north to put America back on top of the soccer world and they did it in style,” Obama said.

All 23 players, coaches and backroom staff filed in to the East Room, greeted by a loud ovation from the invited guests. To begin the ceremony, a 13-year-old girl, Ayla, from Massachusetts, shared a letter she wrote to President and Mrs Obama towards the end of Canada 2015.

The letter explained her anger after her brother told her that ‘boys are so much better at soccer than girls’, and that she wanted the White House’s help to prove him wrong.

Obama hailed young Ayla’s courage and used her letter to frame his congratulatory remarks to the recent Women’s World Cup champions. “They’ve done it with class. They’ve done it the right way. They’ve done it with excitement. They’ve done with style. We are very, very proud of them,” he said.

“Girls like Ayla [were told] they weren’t somehow supposed to be as good at sports as boys,” Obama said. “And Ayla got mad, and she should be mad with those attitudes.”

“This team taught all America’s children that ‘playing like a girl’ means you’re a badass. Playing like a girl means being the best. It means drawing the largest TV audience for a soccer match – men or women’s – in American history.”

(Arun Kumar, IANS)


Popular

Photo by Flickr.

Swastika, one of the sacred symbols used by many religions like Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism.

The symbol of Swastika is known to signify peace, prosperity, and good fortune in the religious cultures of Eurasia. In fact, this symbol is considered very significant in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. But, at the same time, it has become one of the most misunderstood religious symbols and has been globally banned in many countries.

The reason why the symbol of Swastika is banned in many countries is because of its association with Adolf Hitler's extreme political ideology, Nazism, as Swastika as its official symbol.

Keep Reading Show less
Pixabay

Since emerging into the public eye with a historic gold medal at the junior world championships in 2016, he has maintained a high level of performance

India celebrated a historic day on August 7, as 23-year-old Neeraj Chopra became the first Indian to win an Olympic gold medal in athletics. In the men's javelin throw event, he achieved his greatest triumph, throwing the javelin 87.58 meters on his second try.

Neeraj Chopra was born on December 24, 1997, in Khandra village in Haryana's Panipat district. He grew up in a Haryanavi family of farmers. He is the brother of two sisters. He graduated from Dayanand Anglo-Vedic College in Chandigarh and is now enrolled in Lovely Professional University in Jalandhar, Punjab, pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree. Chopra was bullied due to his obesity as a kid, which prompted his father to enroll him in a nearby gym. He then joined a gym in Panipat, where Jaiveer Choudhary, a javelin thrower, noticed his potential and coached him. When the 13-year-old Chopra finished training under Jaiveer for a year, he was enrolled at the Tau Devi Lal Sports Complex in Panchkula, where he began training under coach Naseem Ahmed.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Gothic dresses displayed in a store

The emergence of the Industrial Revolution in Victorian England brought with it many apprehensions and fears that translated into a new genre in literature: the gothic. Today, the idea of the gothic does not have to much with literature as much as it is associated with fashion.

The Victorians began to wear black more often during the Industrial Revolution to hide the stains of soot on their clothes. Many of the working class were employed in factories. They were newly introduced to technology, the idea of coal as fuel, and the working of machines to serve a certain purpose. This kind of work was hard and messy. Wearing light colours burdened the tired folk when the stubborn stains did not get washed away.

Keep reading... Show less