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(Representational Image) Temple in Saidpur. Image Source: flickr.com
  • Capital Development Authority records mention the centuries-old temple in Saidpur had a Dharamshala, which was converted into a public toilet after the renovation
  • The Rama Mandir in Saidpur village was built by Raja Mann Singh in the 1580s
  • The Hindu residents of Islamabad have to go all the way to Rawalpindi to offer their prayers even though there is a temple turned tourist site in Saidpur village

On National Minorities Day in Pakistan, which is on August 11, Hindus in Islamabad might get a place to pray, if the campaign to revive an abandoned Hindu Temple works out well. Pakistan celebrates The National Minorities Day to highlight the contribution and services made by the minority communities towards the growth of the nation.

The Hindu residents of Islamabad have to go all the way to Rawalpindi to offer their prayers even though there is a temple turned tourist site in Saidpur village. They are now planning to revive the temple so that the 850 Hindus living in the city can have a place for religious gatherings, mentioned the indiatoday.in reports.


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The Rama Mandir in Saidpur village was built by Raja Mann Singh in the 1580s. During that time, Saidpur had a significant Hindu population and after the partition in 1947, many left the place and the temple fell into disuse. Later, they were barred from performing religious rituals in the temple.

Capital Development Authority records mention the centuries-old temple had a Dharamshala, which was converted into a public toilet after the renovation. The carvings of Hindu Goddess Lakshmi and Kali in the walls were painted over by the CDA in 2006, mentioned the indiatoday.in reports.


Representational Pic. Image Source: indiatoday.in

According to the Express Tribune reports, “the sanctity of the holy place will be restored and Hindu families living in Islamabad will finally have a place to pray,” said PTI lawmaker Lal Chand Malhi, who is leading the campaign. He also added, “First, we will try to force the government and its departments to allow us to make the temple operational. If no response is received, community members, political parties and civil society will open it for prayers.”

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Letters requesting the revival of the temple is likely to be written to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and President Mamnoon Hussain of Pakistan. Apart from that, the issue will also be addressed to Islamabad Mayor Ansar Aziz, who is the custodian of the site, on August 11.

Islamabad Mayor said to the indiatoday.in, he is ready to support the request once he receives it. He also adds that he will be more than happy to help Hindus living in Islamabad to get access to the temple.

– prepared by Ajay Krishna of NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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