Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×



By Harshmeet Singh

Prime Minister Modi concluded his three nation tour after making a slew of agreements and announcements in Sri Lanka. While moves such as handing over more than 27,000 homes to the war affected people in Jaffna and an assistance of $318 million gathered much attention, his announcement regarding Indian Government’s plans to establish a Ramayana trail in Sri Lanka went away unnoticed.

Ramayana Trail

The establishment of a Ramayana trail is aimed at developing all the Ramayana related mythological spots in the country. Though the PM fell short of announcing any budget or a deadline for the same, he did mention that his Government would soon be sending a team of experts to Sri Lanka to visit all such places that can be included under this plan.

The government plans to develop a number of modern facilities around these spots to ensure a constant tourists’ influx which, in turn, would take India’s heritage to different parts of the world. The PM also said that his Government would be happy to assist Sri Lanka in developing a similar Buddha trail in India.

Common history of India & Sri Lanka

The extremely rich Buddhist culture of Sri Lanka derives its roots from ancient India. According to ancient texts of Sri Lanka, it was Indian Emperor Ashoka’s son, Mahinda, who introduced Buddhism to Sri Lanka. Impressed by the message of Buddhism carried by Mahinda, the Monarch propagated Buddhist values to the entire Sinhalese population of the island. The historic Nalanda University also had a number of Sri Lankan Buddhist monks on roll before it was brought to the ground by Mohammed Kilji. Notably, around 70% Sri Lankans still follow Theravada Buddhism.

The Indian epic Ramayana gives a detailed description of the island nation. According to Ramayana, the island was built by Vishwakarma as a gift for Kubera, the Wealth Lord. Kubera was later overthrown by his stepbrother, Ravana. The story of Sita’s abduction at the hands of Ravana is one of the best known folklores around the world. The ‘Ram Setu’ or the ‘Adam’s bridge’, believed to be built by Lord Rama to take his army to Lanka to fight Ravana still remains one of the most significant common heritage points between India and Sri Lanka.

Ram Setu

Historically, the Indian railway network extended up to Dhanushkodi (south of Chennai) from where frequent ferry rides took the passengers to the Mannar Island in Sri Lanka. The ferry used to travel over the submerged Adam’s Bridge. A devastating cyclone in 1964 destroyed the railway facilities at Dhanushkodi which were never resurrected after that. This put an end to the ferry rides between Dhanushkodi and Mannar Island.

The shallow water over the Adam’s bridge doesn’t allow large cargo chips to pass through it. Hence, the large ships coming either from Arabian Sea or Bay of Bengal are needed to travel around Sri Lanka to reach the other side. The construction of a canal through the ‘Ram Setu’ to ease out the marine traffic has been proposed multiple times, with the most recent project being ‘Sethusamudram Shipping Canal Project’. Quite understandably, these plans didn’t go well with a number of religious groups who, presenting evidence from NASA’s satellite images, claim that this bridge was built by Lord Rama and has a high religious significance attached to it. Notably, the efforts to build this canal have also received thumbs down from a number of environmental experts who doubt the feasibility of such plans and claim that this could destroy the corals.

Growing bonhomie through tourism?

A number of experts have lauded Modi’s methods of warming up to the neighbouring nations by giving references to our common heritage. As seen with many nations, tourism and common heritage can help the nations come together and solve a number of grave issues. Let’s hope the story between India and Sri Lanka goes the same way.


Popular

Photo by Luca Bravo on Unsplash

When transitioning to tech, some communication, innovation, research, and analytical skills come in very handy.

By- Sebastian Miller

When transitioning to the tech world. One of the scariest things can be the fear of living up to the task. It is because you feel like you do have the right skills for the job. But this should not be the case. If you have worked before in any other field outside of tech, you most definitely have skills that you can use. These skills might not all be relevant for the tech job, but some of them might come in handy. When you are transferring to a tech job, the first thing to focus on is transferable skills. The good thing is that some skills span through different fields, and if a candidate has them, they are desirable. To add to this, we have technical skills. These skills are easier to learn compared to other skills. When transitioning to tech, some communication, innovation, research, and analytical skills come in very handy. These skills will give you an edge when getting into the tech world. According to professional dissertation writer, these are the most important skills hat can help you get an edge when applying to jobs that are in tech:

Keep Reading Show less

The IAS exam is conducted by the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) to appoint the most deserving candidates for IAS, IPS, IFS, and other respected positions.

By- Collegedunia

The majority of candidates writing the UPSC exam have only one goal in mind, to become an IAS officer. The Indian Administrative Service (IAS) is one of the most sought-after careers that gives the golden chance of serving the nation.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Interestingly, 63% of the overall registrations in the training were made by women learners from Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Pune, and Hyderabad.

By- Sunidhi Beeliya

Internshala Trainings, the e-learning arm of Internshala, recently brought out a report highlighting the inclination of young graduates towards learning professional communication skills. The platform has registered a massive increase of 90% in the number of enrollments, in communication skills training, within the past 1 year.

Keep reading... Show less