Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×

New Delhi: A leading US robotic surgeon said, “with expertise in traditional head and neck surgical procedures, the country is ready for robot-assisted surgeries to treat head and neck patients in days to come.

Dr Chris Holsinger, 48, who leads Stanford Cancer Centre’s Head and Neck Oncology practice, has been interacting closely with leading Indian head and neck oncologists since 2008.


“I would love to work with more hospitals in India and do collaborative work for providing succour to head and neck cancer patients,” Holsinger told IANS in an e-mail interview.

According to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), over 200,000 head and neck cancers are reported in the country each year. Of these, nearly three-fourths relate to cancer of the oral cavity, throat and voice box.

“The Stanford Medical Center is working with leading oncologists with Indian healthcare providers like (Delhi’s) Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre (RGCIRC) and (Mumbai’s) Tata Memorial Cancer Hospital for a study of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) negative patients. About 80 percent of Indian cancer patients test negative for HPV,” Holsinger said.

HPV negative is a more aggressive head and neck cancer and may be hard to treat with standard approaches of radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy.

“But in the US, the incidence of this disease is too rare. I believe this consortium of Indian robotic head and neck surgeons that gathered in Delhi can pave the way to launch this study and (we hope) to improve outcomes for patients with this disease,” Holsinger stressed.

When it comes to radiotherapy vs robotic surgery, he sees both treatment choices as complementary rather than competitive.

“In the US, we see better results for patients when a multi-disciplinary approach is used. In other words, both the surgeon and the radiation oncologists must be strong but flexible advocates for their patients,” he elaborated.

Consumption of tobacco in various forms – smoking, chewing of paan (betel leaf) and gutka – is a major contributor to head and neck cancer, especially oral cancer.

“Using tobacco and also consuming alcohol only further increase that risk. There are many genes now known to be associated with head and neck cancers, but only rare inherited syndromes are associated with the disease,” said Holsinger, who was in New Delhi last week to attend a workshop.

“I was able to observe Dr Surender Dabas (of RGCIRC) perform two surgical procedures for removal of two head and neck cancers. Afterwards, the team at RGCIRC organised a lively workshop with over 125 attendees,” Holsinger said.

“This kind of collaboration allows the multidisciplinary team to provide a more personalized treatment depending on the stage of cancer and the affected head and neck organs as well as the patient’s preferences and his or her speech and swallowing function at the time of diagnosis.”

Use of computer-assisted surgery (via a surgical robot) to remove cancerous tissues or tumours in the head and neck areas helps the surgeon see the affected areas far more clearly – which is not possible in open surgery.

“A surgical robot helps in accessing the head and neck area through the oral cavity (mouth) thus reducing trauma, pain and blood loss. Best of all, minimally invasive surgical procedures do not leave any scars on the face or neck and recovery is much quicker,” the surgeon said.

Dr Dabas had spent nearly two months with Dr Holsinger at Houston’s MD Anderson Cancer Center some years ago.

Dr Dabas told IANS: “Head and neck cancers represent the fifth most common type and cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In India, head and neck cancers account for nearly one-third of all cancer tumours. Poor oral hygiene escalates the chances of contracting oral cancer manifold.”

Any visible lesions, ulcers, difficulty in swallowing food, change in voice and pain in the ear present themselves as early signs of cancer.

Oral and pharyngeal carcinoma represent a significant public health problem worldwide, with more than 400,000 new cases per year.

India and the US, as also western Europe, have the highest incidences of oropharyngeal cancer worldwide, ranging from seven-17 cases per 100,000 people.

“In the US, we are seeing an epidemic of these cancers, especially in the oropharynx, due to an association with the HPV, which may be rising in India as well,” Dr Holsinger stated.(IANS)


Popular

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

Pickles bottled in various combinations

India is known for its pickles, popularly called 'Achaar', even across the world. But who thought about the idea of pickles in the first place? Apparently, the idea of making pickles first came from the ancient civilisation of Mesopotamia, where archaeologists have found evidence of cucumbers being soaked in vinegar. This was done to preserve it, but the practice has spread all over the world today, that pickles mean so much more than just preserved vegetables.

In India, the idea of pickle has nothing to do with preservation, rather pickle is a side dish that adds flavour and taste to almost anything. In Punjab, parathas are served with pickle; in the south, pickle and curd rice is a household favourite, and in Andhra, it is a staple, eaten with everything. The flavour profile of pickles in each state is naturally different, suited to each cuisine's taste. Pickles are soaked in oil and salt for at least a month, mixed with spices and stored all year round. Mango season is often synonymous with pickle season as a majority of Indians love mango pickle. In the coastal cities, pickles are even made out of fish and prawns.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Spiral bound notebooks allow writers to easily access each part of the page

It is impossible to detail the history of bookbinding without understanding the need for it. A very useful, and yet simple invention, spiral coils that hold books together and allow mobile access to the user came about just before WWII, but much before that, paper underwent a massive change in production technique.

Beginning in China, paper was made of bamboo sticks slit open and flattened. In Egypt, papyrus was made from the reeds that grew in the Nile. In India, long, rectangular strips of palm leaves were stitched together to form legible documents. When monasteries were established, scrolls came into being. Parchment paper, or animal hide, also known as vellum, were used to copy out texts periodically to preserve them. Prior to all this, clay tablets were used to record important events, and in some cases, rock edicts were made.

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

Devina Singhania, the Founder of 'LE JAHAAN', a local home and decor accessories company, explains how the gifting paradigm has shifted.

By N. Lothungbeni Humtsoe

To keep the value and quality of what you offer, whether it's a romantic breakfast in bed or a royal wedding gift that will be remembered for years. The concept of gift-giving has taken on a number of shapes in today's society. Devina Singhania, the Founder of 'LE JAHAAN', a local home and decor accessories company, explains how the gifting paradigm has shifted.

Q: What do consumers expect from the gifting business and packaging designers these days?

A: Today's consumers are expecting more minimal sustainable products, designs and mediums. They are now more conscious about how their purchase affects the environment. Considering this shift in consumer buying, it's extremely important for companies to increase their commitments to responsible business practices and design products that are meant to be reused or recycled.

person holding white and red gift box Today's consumers are expecting more minimal sustainable products, designs and mediums. | Photo by Superkitina on Unsplash

Keep reading... Show less