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Bull-taming. Image Source: Youtube
  • SC had restrained the Tamil Nadu government from conducting its traditional bull-taming sport ‘Jallikattu’
  • The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change has sent draft on June 15
  • Once Cabinet passes it, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (amendment) Bill, 2016 will be brought to Parliament in the monsoon session

After the Supreme Court restrained the Tamil Nadu government from conducting its traditional bull-taming sport Jallikattu, and stayed the Centre’s notification lifting the ban on it, the Law and Justice Ministry has given its approval to a draft amendment to the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960, which will allow the use of animals in traditional cultural practices.

“What is the necessity of such festivals… like Jallikattu? There was no festival for four years… as an interim measure, we direct that there shall be stay of notification dated January 7, 2016, issued by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, until further orders,” a bench of Justices Dipak Misra and N V Ramana stated in January.


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The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change had sent the draft on June 15, seeking to change section 22 of the Act by adding a new sub-section.

Bull-Taming. Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

“Any animal notified in the official gazette, in exercise of the powers conferred under sub-section (II) of section 22 of the Act shall continue to be exhibited or trained as a performing animal, at events, in a manner prescribed the religion of any community, or practiced traditionally under the customs or as a part of the culture, in any part of the country. These events may, inter-alia, include Jallikattu in Tamil Nadu, and bullock cart races in Maharashtra, Karnataka, Punjab, Haryana, Kerala, Gujarat, etc,” reads the draft amendment, reports Scroll.in.

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Once Cabinet passes it, the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (amendment) Bill, 2016 will be brought to Parliament in the monsoon session, which starts on July 18, reported The New Indian Express.

-This report is modified by Ajay Krishna, a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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