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Salman Khan was accompanied by actors Saif Ali Khan, Tabu and Neelam on this trip when the blackbucks were hunted.

By Archana Sharma
A silent revolution is in process in Jodhpur where youths of the Bishnoi community are collecting funds to build a grand memorial in the memory of the blackbucks that were buried here in Kankani village after being poached by Bollywood star Salman Khan 24 years ago. Salman Khan was accompanied by actors Saif Ali Khan, Tabu and Neelam on this trip when the blackbucks were hunted.
The land where these blackbucks were buried will have a memorial soon, said Prem Saran, one of the youths behind the project. The memorial will have a statue of a blackbuck and 1,000 trees will be planted on the land where the mute animal was buried, he said adding that a few young boys from his community have formed a WhatsApp group which has started a fund collection drive. They are collecting around Rs 500 to Rs 1000 from each person to ensure they have around Rs 2 lakh for the memorial.

selective focus photography of person reloading rifle The memorial will be built in around a year, said Prem. | Photo by Hunter Brumels on Unsplash


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