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Digital becomes more popular and companies expand their D2C (direct-to-consumer) connections

Smartphone companies which have strong consumer pull now face most of the reputation issues caused by infringement of their brands in the digital space, according to a new report.

There are three main techniques pertaining to brand infringement —fake gratification, fake presence and fake representation.

According to Faisal Kawoosa, founder and chief analyst, Techarc, as digital becomes mainstream and brands increase their D2C (direct-to-consumer) engagements, they need to proactively police the digital space to hunt for any infringement cases.

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"The first thing brands need to do is to come out of denial mode and create a common synergy between marketing, ecommerce, IT and digital teams," he said in the Brand Reputation Index (BRIX) report.

In fake gratification, scammers infringe any brand's identity by offering fake coupons, rewards, schemes, and discounts. This is the easiest trap for consumers who are searching for best deals when they decide about buying a smartphone of their interest.

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People's dependence on technology gradually disconnects them from socializing, resulting in increased isolation.

Technology has far-reaching consequences on people's daily lives. We can say that advanced technology connects the world more. People now have better access to information and enhanced connections through social networking, and it isn't easy to do anything without technology. However, rather than bringing people closer together, it feels that people's dependence on technology gradually disconnects them from socializing, resulting in increased isolation. People's perceptions of themselves and their relationships are changing as a result of technological advancements.

Technology cannot be held entirely responsible for our feelings of isolation. Temperament, mental health, and isolating events such as cross-country migrations, career changes, divorces, and loved ones' deaths have a significant influence. There's also the issue of causality vs. correlation: It's difficult to discern whether we're lonelier as we spend so much time online or we spend so much time online because we're lonelier. However, researchers argue that our interactions with technology impact the feeling of loneliness in irrefutable ways. It's not only that technology offers the appearance of connectedness. The availability of limitless opportunities for engagement reduces our tolerance for isolation while heightening expectations about the amount, speed, and regularity of our relationships.

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CCS Insight noted that geopolitical tensions related to Huawei's role in 5G rollouts led to delays, especially in western Europe.

The global switch to 5G is well underway, with the number of connections to the next-generation network set to reach 1.34 billion in 2022, says a new report. According to an analysis by market researcher CCS Insight, this year has seen connections to 5G triple to 637 million, suggesting that the roll-out of the network is continuing apace.

National lockdowns caused by the global health crisis in 2020 slowed network rollout, for example making it more difficult to send engineers on the ground to physically build the infrastructure, ZDNet reported. CCS Insight noted that geopolitical tensions related to Huawei's role in 5G rollouts led to delays, especially in western Europe. European countries were effectively hesitant to allow Huawei to provide critical infrastructure for their 5G networks after the Trump administration in the US raised concerns that the company might pose a security risk due to its ties with the Chinese government.

"The US being one country, the decisions were made relatively quickly while in Europe every country had to make its own decision as to what to do with Huawei," Marina Koytcheva, Vice-President of forecasting at CCS Insight, told the tech website. "In some countries, operators had to wait a little bit to see whether they'd be allowed to use Huawei equipment and in which part of the network. That was probably an even more significant delaying factor than Covid-19 in 2020," Koytcheva added.

Indias map with 5G written on it. One of the key reasons that deployment is accelerating is that consumers are now buying devices that are 5G-enabled in 2021. | Wikimedia Commons

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India may not see a billion smartphone users even by the end of this decade

India may not see a billion smartphone users even by the end of this decade and there are seven key challenges to achieve 100 per cent smartphone penetration, according to a new report. With the shrinking addressable base for smartphones, India is likely to have 887.4 million smartphone users by 2030, said the report by Gurugram-based market intelligence firm techARC.

The new smartphone user acquisition has been on a decline since 2018, after 4G drove switch to smartphones as it ushered several new use cases and forced feature phone users to upgrade. This, however, is not the case with 5G, which can substantially bring out a new use case for the mobile users compelling the feature phone users to move to a smartphone.

Affordability is the first concern even if users would discover their own use cases. "This is on account of both - investment in the device and the recurring data cost. Even to own a device, it's a substantial increase in the outlay for around 200-250 million users who cannot spent more than Rs 1,500 on a mobile device," said Faisal Kawoosa, Founder and Chief Analyst, techARC.

round gold-colored rupee coins and banknotes Even to own a device, it's a substantial increase in the outlay for around 200-250 million users who cannot spent more than Rs 1,500 on a mobile device. | Photo by rupixen.com on Unsplash

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