Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
B-schools in US Source: Pixabay

Sept 18, 2016: Two Indian students, Rashmita Redkar and Shreya Mathai were offered scholarships when they applied for MBA programme earlier this year, to get engaged with the top-most business schools of US.

Mathai got offers of $100,000 from Harvard and $120,000 from Kellogg while, Redkar got four offers — $100,000 from Harvard, $120,000 from Kellogg, $60,000 from Tuck and $54,000 from Wharton.


Later, both chose Harvard Business School. Redkar also got the chance to became one of the six students to get the Horace W Goldsmith Fellowship.

US Business Schools like they believe are the best in the world and are hence keen to get the best candidates. Apparently, they are finding most of their suitable candidates from India, reported Economic Times.

The quality of Indian students has led to an increase in the number of scholarships on offer, consultants said.

Consultant agencies like Admissions Gateway, ReachIvy, WhiteGlow have reported a 35-40 per cent upsurge in the quality and quantity of scholarships offered by the educational institutions eager on admitting candidates who they think can manage the pressure of maintaining their academic character.


Indian candidates are preferred over others in US B-schools. Wikimedia

Other scholarship tales include Rohit Sudheendranath, who chose Harvard when he was bestowed with offers of $100,000 by Harvard and $120,000 by Kellogg.

Swagnik Bhattacharya was also offered a scholarship worth $100,000 by Kellogg.

“Scholarships have become more meaningful,” said Rajdeep Chimni of Admissions Gateway, as the amount of scholarships awarded has risen around 33% among the top B-schools.

The University of Virginia Darden School of Business’ Sara Neher, who is admissions dean, said that they are completely focused on providing scholarships to more students and Indians in particular.

“We are lucky to have very high-quality applicants from India. We would also love to see more diversity in terms of gender, work industry, undergraduate major,” she added.

Consultant ReachIvy’s students have received $500,000 in scholarship money in the last three years.

About 40 percent got some kind of sustenance this year, up from 35 percent last year. Merit-based scholarships awarded to Indians have risen across the board at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Virginia, Dartmouth and other schools. In the 2015-16 academic year, Yale University told ET it spent around $5 million (Rs 33 crore) of its own funds to support students from India, who numbered 179, third after China and Canada, mentioned Economic Times report.

Merit-based scholarships awarded to Indians have seen a high rise across the board at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Virginia, Dartmouth and other popular B-schools. In the 2015-16 academic year, Yale University told ET it spent around $5 million (Rs 33 crore) of its own funds to support students from India, who numbered 179, third after China and Canada.

In the 2015-16 academic year, Yale University declared that it has spent around $5 million (Rs 33 crore) of its own funds to support the deserving and talented students from India, who numbered 179, third after China and Canada.

“The average Yale scholarship grant was $43,989 for the 2015-2016 school year,” said George Joseph of The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

ReachIvy head Vibha Kagzi said, “Business schools have realised that an annual tuition fee of $50,000 is too high for many candidates. That number will go higher when living and other costs are added.”

Delhi-based consultant Mansie Dewan said nearly 95 percent of her clients have got some form of aid from the top 30 US B-schools, such as Anderson, Kenan Flagler, and Emory Goizueta. Scholarships are up 40 percent from last year.

That’s key to improving standards and maintaining academic rigour, said Narayanan Ramaswamy, partner, education and skill development sector, KPMG India. “An average Indian student is often perceived to be better than an average Western one,” he said. “The quality of Indian students is just one of the reasons why foreign universities want more of them.

WhiteGlow consultancy’s Rajiv Ganjoo said while scholarships have risen, schools are seeking quality candidates.

Several schools have also adopted a common-application model, which means students can use one form for seeking aid, making the process much less cumbersome. Kagzi said, however, that some schools still require students to apply separately for each scholarship.

Indians have always been the most preferred choice whenever it came to seizing the job opportunities in the US or getting a place at the top-most B-schools. (VOA)

– prepared by Arya Sharan of NewsGram. Twitter: @NoOffense9


Popular

wikimedia commons

A Jain monk offering ablution to Bahubali in Shravanabelagola

Atop the Vindhyagiri hills in Karnataka, a 57-foot-tall statue stands. This is the statue of Lord Gomateshwara, or Bahubali, as he is known to the local patrons. The surrounding area is filled with temples where each of the many Jain Tirthankaras sits.

Sharavanabelagola is named after a pond that is located at the foothills. 'Bel' in Kannada means white, and 'kola' means pond. This is a sacred water body to the activities of the temples. It is a tourist attraction and a pilgrim destination located 85 kilometres from Mysore, and 145 kilometres from the capital, Bangalore.

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Lina Trochez on Unsplash

Clean and maintained hands boost confidence in daily life activities.

If you feel that clean and well-groomed hands are just an essential prerequisite for women, you might like to think twice. Men should equally pay attention to their hands because our hand houses 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of its skin. You can easily assume what havoc it can create in our body because in India we have the culture of eating with our hands and spaces beneath nails can become breeding heaven for germs. Moreover, clean and maintained hands boost confidence in their daily life activities. Therefore, it's important to keep your hands clean irrespective of your gender by washing or sanitizing at regular intervals. And, to keep them groomed, you don't have to visit a salon.

Rajesh U Pandya, Managing Director, KAI India, gives easy and completely doable tips to follow at home:

* Refrain from harsh soaps: You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. Your soap can have a moisturizing element in it like aloe vera or shea butter. Ensure that you're washing your hands with normal water as hot water can make your hand's skin dry and scaly.

Soap bars organic You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. | Photo by Aurélia Dubois on Unsplash

Keep reading... Show less