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Abnormal Rise in Average Fertility Rate in Indian Women

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Infants. Image Source: www.nato.int
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As many as 19 million women in India have given birth to seven or more children, and 15 million (80 percent) of them live in rural areas, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of recently released census. According to the recorded data, there has been an abrupt increase in the average fertility rate of Indian women.

  • This is equivalent to Niger’s population, a country in Africa with a fertility rate of 6.76. The countries with the highest fertility rates in the world are mostly situated in Africa.
  • There were fewer such women with higher levels of education, the data further reveal -15 million of those women were illiterate as against 0.09 million who were graduates and above.
A human fetal face. Wikimedia Commons
A human fetal face. Wikimedia Commons
  • Educated women have fewer births, average births per woman declined since 2001.
  • The average births per woman in India is 3.3, a decline of 13 percent from 3.8 in 2001, based on the total births given by women in the 45-49 years age group (which marks the end of their child-bearing age), according to the World Health Organization.
  • The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) estimates India’s average fertility per woman at 2.48 which is the highest among BRICS nations and just better than Pakistan in the sub-continent.

Related article: India’s population to overtake China’s by 2022

  • Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have lower fertility rates.
  • Though the CIA data differs from the census, trends indicate that Indian women have higher fertility rates than sub-continental countries and other similar economies.
  • The average births decline with increase in education levels, according to census data. The average births for women who are graduates and above is 1.9, against 3.8 for women who are illiterate.
  • The spread of female education is a likely cause for falling fertility among women, according to this report by The Economist. Female literacy in India increased from 53.7 percent in 2001 to 64.6 percent in 2011, according to census data.
  • As many as 1,423 females in rural areas have never attended any educational institution for every 1,000 males who have not done so, and only 577 females attend college for every 1,000 males in rural areas, IndiaSpend reported earlier.
  • 320,000 girls below age 15 have already reported two births.
  • As many as 0.32 million girls who are married and aged less than 15 years have given birth to two children-an increase of 88 percent since 2001, when the figure was 0.17 million.
  • Further, 0.28 million married girls in the age group of 15-19 years have already given birth to four children, which is an increase of 65% from 0.17 million in 2001.
  • Adolescent pregnancy can lead to several health problems – anaemia, malaria, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, postpartum haemorrhage and mental disorders -according to the World Health Organization.
  • Nearly 12.7 million girls in India aged between 10-19 years are married and six million children were born to them, IndiaSpend reported earlier.  (IANS)

 

 

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India successfully test fires n-capable Agni-V ballistic missile

The missile was earlier tested successfully in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016.

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Nirbhay
The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) sources said the Nirbhay missile test was "successful".(Representative image) VOA
  • India successfully tests the Agni-V ballistic missile on Thursday
  • This was the fifth test that missile underwent
  • With this success, India is now in ranks with US, UK, China and Russia

India on Thursday successfully tests fired its indigenously developed intercontinental surface-to-surface nuclear-capable ballistic missile Agni-V — the most potent and with the longest range in the Agni series – that can reach targets as far as Beijing.

The test took place at the Abdul Kalam Island facility off the Odisha coast. Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman tweeted about its success, congratulating its makers DRDO, the armed forces and the defence industry.

You may also like: Ballistic missile Agni-IV test fired as part of user trial

India has many high tech and powerful missiles to its name. Wikimedia Commons
India has many high tech and powerful missiles to its name. Wikimedia Commons

She said the successful test of the 5,000-km-range missile that can carry a one-tonne warhead, was “a major boost to the defence capabilities of our country”.

“The Made in India canistered missile, having three stages of propulsion, was successfully test fired,” she tweeted.

Developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), the Agni-V is the most advanced version of the Agni series, part of the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme that started in the 1960s.

The missile was earlier tested successfully in 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2016.

This was the fifth test of the missile and likely to be its first user trial, though there was no official word on it.

India is developing new technologies everyday to strengthen its defence.
India is developing new technologies every day to strengthen its defence.

Thursday’s test brings the missile closer to its induction in the tri-service Strategic Forces Command.

The missile has a much longer shelf life, with its container being made of special steel that absorbs the blast of the takeoff.

In the canisterised launch, a gas generator inside ejects the missile up to a height of about 30 metres. A motor is then ignited to fire the missile.

Also Read: Nikki Haley says North Korea Could Face Stronger Sanctions due to its 7th Missile test in 2017

With this missile, India joins the super-exclusive club of ICBM (missiles with a range of over 5,000-5,500 km) capable countries of the US, Russia, the UK, France and China. IANS