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Afghani people are Refugees in their own homes, thanks to Civil War and Taliban

Afghans already form one of the world’s largest refugee populations, with an estimated 2.6 million of them living in neighboring Pakistan and Iran

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A refugee camp, Wikimedia commons
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ISLAMABAD- The number of Afghans who have fled violence and remain trapped in their own country has doubled over the past three years, says a new report by Amnesty International.

A staggering 1.2 million people are internally displaced in Afghanistan, showing a dramatic increase from some 500,000 in 2013, says the report in an attempt to cast a fresh light on the country’s forgotten victims of war. It comes amid fears of an escalation in the Taliban-led insurgent attacks this year.

“Even after fleeing their homes to seek safety, increasing numbers of Afghans are languishing in appalling conditions in their own country, and fighting for their survival with no end in sight,” warned Amnesty’s South Asia Director Champa Patel.

https://youtu.be/EETwbQtVKFU

 

Afghans already form one of the world’s largest refugee populations, with an estimated 2.6 million of them living in neighboring Pakistan and Iran, according to the U.N. refugee agency.

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“While the world’s attention seems to have moved on from Afghanistan, we risk forgetting the plight of those left behind by the conflict,” said Patel.

Despite the promises made by successive Afghan governments, internally displaced people (IDPs) in Afghanistan continue to lack adequate shelter, food, water, health care, and opportunities to pursue education and employment, according to Amnesty International’s findings.

Number of Refugee from Afghanistan are increasing, Wikimedia commons
The number of Refugee from Afghanistan are increasing, Wikimedia commons

The research found the situation facing IDPs has dramatically worsened over the past years, with less aid and essentials, such as food.It blamed alleged corruption, a lack of capacity in the Afghan government and fading international interest for a lack of implementation of a new national IDP Policy launched in 2014.

Instead, the report says, forced evictions by both the government and private sectors is a daily threat to the IDPs.“The Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation, charged with coordinating the Policy’s implementation, is badly under-resourced and has been beset by corruption allegations for years,” it added.

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Most of the internally displaced population lacks basic health care facilities, and education for IDP children has been interrupted since they were forced to leave their homes.

“They have lost the traditional sources of their livelihoods, and only have a few opportunities for informal work, creating circumstances where women are excluded, and children are being exploited and not educated,” said Patel.

Amnesty International has called on the Afghan authorities and the international community to immediately ensure that the most urgent needs of those displaced are met.“Afghanistan and the world must act now to end the country’s displacement crisis before it is too late,” Patel warned.The Afghan government has not yet commented on Amnesty’s report.(VOA)

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  • Pritam Go Green

    World superpowers along with the United Nations should take a look o this issue. Our Afghani brothers and sisters are suffering a lot. We need to help them asap.

  • devika todi

    this is an issue that requires urgent attention of the organisations who contribute in eradicating it.

Next Story

Trump Launched A New Attack On Mueller Probe In Russia

Democrats also took note of the report

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President Donald Trump walks to an interview on the North Lawn of the White House, Friday, June 15, 2018, in Washington.
President Donald Trump walks to an interview on the North Lawn of the White House, Friday, June 15, 2018, in Washington. VOA

Outside the White House Friday, a media frenzy.

And at the center of it all, President Donald Trump.

“Can we do one question at a time? Wait! One question at a time,” the president scolded reporters.

Trump launched a new attack on the Russia probe in the wake of a critical report on the Hillary Clinton email investigation by the inspector general of the Department of Justice.

“I did nothing wrong. There was no collusion. There was no obstruction,” he said. “The IG (inspector general) report yesterday went a long way to show that, and I think that the Mueller investigation has been totally discredited.”

But the report in question only dealt with how the FBI handled the Clinton email controversy.

It was critical of the man Trump fired as FBI director, James Comey, but rejected the notion of a politically-directed effort aimed at Trump.

“This report did not find any evidence of political bias or improper considerations actually impacting the investigation under review,” announced current FBI Director Christopher Wray.

Democrats also took note of the report.

“Anyone who is hoping to use this report to undermine the Mueller probe or prove the existence of a ‘deep state’ conspiracy against President Trump will be sorely disappointed,” Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said.

During his lengthy encounter with reporters Friday, Trump also defended his recent summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Former FBI Director James Comey begins book tour in support of new memoir 'A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership', published by Flatiron Books yesterday.
Former FBI Director James Comey begins book tour in support of new memoir ‘A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership’, published by Flatiron Books yesterday. VOA

“They are doing so much for us, and now we are well on our way to get denuclearization,” he said. “And the agreement says there will be total denuclearization. Nobody wants to report that. I got along with him great. We have a great chemistry together. That is a good thing, not a bad thing.”

Trump also lashed out at opposition Democrats and tried to blame them for recent administration actions to separate family members caught trying to come across the U.S. border.

“The Democrats forced that law upon our nation. I hate it. I hate to see separation of parents and children,” Trump said.

A host of Democrats on Capitol Hill blasted the president’s comments, including Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham of New Mexico.

“There are no substantive defenses, no policy defenses, to their current actions separating families and taking children away from their mothers and fathers at the border. It just is another indication that they cannot govern,” she said.

Also read: North Korean Defectors Feeling Betrayed By Trump

Trump’s relatively lengthy encounter with the media Friday was unusual for a president who tends to favor appearances on Fox News Channel and who generally takes only a few questions at news conferences. (VOA)