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Britain steps up attacks on ISIS, doubles warplanes

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London: British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has said that the deployment of Typhoons and two further Tornados would double the number of British fighter jets taking the fight against the ISIS militant group.

ISIS terrorists have again been struck by British Royal Air Force aircraft, with Typhoon fighters jets used for the first time in bombing missions over Syria and Iraq, according to British Ministry of Defence, Xinhua reported.

During the evening of December 4, Tornado GR4s and Typhoon FGR4s, based at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus, conducted a further series of strikes on targets in the very large IS-controlled oilfield at Omar in eastern Syria, MoD said on Saturday in a statement on Saturday.

“The Tornados and Typhoons used Paveway IV guided bombs to hit wellheads, thus cutting off the terrorists’ oil revenue at the very source. Eight attacks were carried out, and early reports suggest that they were successful,” the statement said.

The ministry claimed British capabilities currently gather 60 percent of the Coalition’s tactical reconnaissance in Iraq and 30 percent of the intelligence in Syria, with over 800 personnel supporting operations in the campaign to degrade Daesh.

Since coalition air operations began last year, the RAF base at Akrotiri has been home to extensive air capabilities, including Tornado GR4s, Voyager air-to-air refueling aircraft, C130 transport aircraft, and Sentinel surveillance aircraft, according to the MoD statement.

Britain launched airstrikes against IS targets in Syria just hours after its Parliament approved a government proposal to extend military action from Iraq to Syria.

(IANS)

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Britain To Ban Sale Of Plastic Straws In Bid To Fight Waste

Britain planning to ban the sale of Plastic products

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An alternative for plastic straws.
Stainless steel straws are displayed at the cooperative Sin Plastico (Without Plastic), which offers environmentally friendly household items free from plastic materials and packaging, in Bilbao, Spain, April 6, 2018. Britain plans to ban the sale of plastic straws and other single-use items. VOA

Britain plans to ban the sale of plastic straws and other single-use products and is pressing Commonwealth allies to also take action to tackle marine waste, the office of Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May said.

It said drink stirrers and cotton buds would also be banned under the plans.

May has pledged to eradicate avoidable plastic waste by 2042 as part of a “national plan of action.”

“Plastic waste is one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the world, which is why protecting the marine environment is central to our agenda at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting,” May said in a statement ahead of a Commonwealth summit Thursday.

A woman drinking from plastic straw
A woman drinks from a paper cup through a plastic straw on Westminster

Leaders from the Commonwealth — a network of 53 countries, mostly former British colonies — are meeting in London this week.

May is looking to deepen ties to the Commonwealth as Britain seeks to boost trade and carve out a new role in the world ahead of the country’s departure from the European Union in March next year.

Britain will commit 61.4 million pounds ($87.21 million) at the summit to develop new ways of tackling plastic waste and help Commonwealth countries limit how much plastic ends up in the ocean.

“We are rallying Commonwealth countries to join us in the fight against marine plastic,” May said.

Also Read: Plastic-Eating Enzyme Accidentally Developed By Scientists

“Together we can effect real change so that future generations can enjoy a natural environment that is healthier than we currently find it.”

The statement said environment minister Michael Gove would launch a consultation later this year into the plan to ban the plastic items. It gave no details who the consultation would be with.  VOA

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