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Cattle Traders lynched: Farmers unable to sell Cattle due to Water shortage in Jharkhand

With only two-third of the 12,000-odd handpumps in the district working, people crowd around them and line up for several hours waiting to fill their containers with water.

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Cattles and their owners at a cattle fair in Maharashtra. (Representational Image). Image source: sandeepachetan.com
  • In fear of repercussions, no one dares to sell cattle, and even if they try, no one is willing to buy
  • After the rivers dried up, people have dug a pit in the river bed for water for both the villagers and cattle to use
  • The emaciated cattle are seen searching  for any leaves or grass to feed on

Jharkhand’s Latehar district had just witnessed two murders this March. Mazlum Ansari, 32, and Imteyaz Khan, the 13-year-old son of another cattle trader, were hanged to death for selling their cattle. Now, Latehar district’s ponds and streams have all dried up for the first time in several years and water has become really scarce. At a time like this, farmers are unable to save their cattle as selling them in another village could lead to their death.

The tribal farmers used to sell their cattle in the dry months before the monsoon and purchase new cattle to plough fields once the monsoon arrived.  Cows and Oxen were sold for cash to tide over any financial distress, and, sometimes, to organise weddings during the lean farm months. Now, months after the lynching, villagers say no one can dare to sell cattle, and even if they try, no one is willing to buy, said the scroll.in report.

Vijay Oraon, a local contractor  told Scroll.in that tribal villagers used cattle sales as a means of supplementing their income as only subsistence farming was possible in the area.

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“I have four oxen, it becomes necessary to sell to tide over these months, but if anyone buys, they may get phaansi [be executed] Then, who will buy?”” said Babulal Oraon, a tribal farmer to Scroll.in.

With a local cow protection group propagating against the sale of cattle in the area, no one dares to sell their cattle.

According to the Scroll.in report, in Nawada village, over 50 families that survived on the cattle trade have now left that work. Most youth have left for construction work elsewhere in the district.

Cattles in a truck. Image Source: indianexpress.com

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With only two-third of the 12,000-odd handpumps in the district working, people crowd around them and line up for several hours waiting to fill their containers with water.

After the rivers dried up, people have dug a pit in the river bed for water for both the villagers and cattle to use.

In these dry lands, the emaciated cattle are seen searching  for any leaves or grass to feed on.

The Scroll.in report says that the cattle cannot be kept as there was no grass or leaves in the fields, and the only pond in the village had all but dried up.  When they got to drink water in the pond, the weaker cattle’s legs get stuck in the quicksand-like mud and they die.

Villagers fish in the only pond left with water in Amwatoli in Balumath, Latehar. Weak cattle get stuck in the wet mud if they try to enter the pond.
What is left of a pond. Image Source: Scroll.in

“The forest is catchingfire, there are no leaves on trees, nothing for the cattle to graze on, grass is all dried up. At this rate, the cattle will die,” says Kujur, a tribal Christian farmer to Scroll.in.

This report is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    There should be some steps taken to supply water to these villages. Like we have trains which supply water to the Latur district in Maharashtra

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Rain is one of the most important factor in India. Not only does farming need water, but rearing cattle stock also requires high amount of water

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UP Man Invents A Shredder Machine To Wipe Out Stubble Burning Issue

Gangaram's this simple innovation could help governments fight the menace of stubble burning

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Bicycle-based shredder machine
Bicycle-based machine can crush particles of the crop residue and can be turned into compost and farmers will not require any chemical fertiliser. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Even as the Centre and the state governments are trying to find a solution to the menace of stubble burning, an innovator from Uttar Pradesh’s Gorakhpur claims to have developed a cost effective solution. Ganga Ram Chauhan has invented a bicycle-based shredder machine which can crush and grind elements, including wood, leaves and crop remains into particles of less than 80 mm size. These particles can then be easily converted into compost. The machine costs only around Rs 5,000-6000, he says.

“A scientist Mita Tarafdar asked me to develop a machine for zero waste management. Stubble burning was an issue that I had always wanted to deal with. So I developed a bicycle-based shredder machine. Crushed particles of the crop residue can be turned into compost and farmers will not require any chemical fertiliser. They can sell their bio crops and vegetables at higher prices,” said Ganga Ram Chauhan.

Senior principal scientist Mita Tarafdar, from the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (CSIR-NML), said that the machine was kept at the centre and can be improvised to benefit farmers and also check pollution due to the stubble burning.

The 50-year-old Ganga Ram Chauhan constantly keeps innovating and was awarded by the Yogi government in 2018 for his innovations.

bicycle-based shredder machine which can crush and grind element
Fumes of smoke seen as farmers burn straw stubble after harvesting the paddy crops in a field. Pixabay

He had developed ‘bogie-rickshaw’ for school children in the year 2000, and has been inventing many useful machines ever since.

“My father was a plumber in Gorakhpur. I am not a science graduate, but technology and invention run in my blood. I had invented a bicycle which can be cycled very easily and its rear tyre does not wear out fast. My invention was approved by the CSIR- NML Jamshedpur and I was awarded for the same by Chief Minister Yogi Adityanth last year,” he said.

ALSO READ:- Eight Kannada authors who have won ‘Jnanpith Award’

Chauhan said: “I am not good at English and do not know the engineering jargon which makes it tough for me to explain and publicise my inventions.”

But, Gangaram’s this simple innovation could help governments fight the menace of stubble burning and may also help curb the rising pollution. (IANS)