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Dad Supports Muslim Daughter if She Chooses to Not Wear Hijab

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A sketch of woman wearing Hijab (Representational Image), Pixabay
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Pennsylvania, April 19, 2017: “When I saw how sweet my dad’s response was I felt that this proved something; it proved that misconceptions are often made about people who end up being the exact opposite”, 17 year old Lamyaa of Pennsylvania said for her father’s unwavering support for her if she chose to not wear a hijab. This grabbed online attention after Lamyaa tweeted the screenshot of this conversation.

This happened after a boy in a group chat told Lamyaa that her father would likely beat her were she to take off her headscarf.

Lamyaa had told the BBC that she did not actually intend to take her scarf off: “It was never part of the plan. I just wanted to prove a point.”

While some supported her father’s reaction, others said they did not have the same choice to voluntarily remove the scarf.

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Commenting on how it all started, Lamyaa said: “I had very strong views considering the impact the Trump presidency has on me because I am an Arab, Muslim woman. I brought up the fact that I was Muslim [in the group chat] and that guy didn’t feel comfortable so he said what he said.

Many messaged Lamyaa support following her post, and she added that some even said it changed their views on the hijab.

“Your dad is perfect and so are you,” Twitter user @LorraineE_C told her.

Twitter user @cassiiealvarado told Lamyaa not to take off her hijab, with @mochamomma adding: “I love this whole thing. There’s trust and mutual respect and, above all, love.”

– Prepared by Upama Bhattacharya. Twitter @Upama_myself

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Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

The researchers collected information about pairs of granddaughters and grandmothers and sequenced portions of the X-chromosome from 186 women affected by cancer

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A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer's age of onset by more than six years. Wikimedia Commons
A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer's age of onset by more than six years. Wikimedia Commons

Scientists have found a gene responsible for ovarian cancer that can be passed down from fathers to their daughters.

The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls.

A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer’s age of onset by more than six years.

“Our study may explain why we find families with multiple affected daughters: because a dad’s chromosomes determine the sex of his children, all of his daughters have to carry the same X-chromosome genes,” said Kevin H.

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Eng, Assistant Professor at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Buffalo, the US.

The study, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, stated that the genetic mutation inherited from the paternal grandmothers were also associated with higher rates of prostate cancer in fathers and sons as well.

The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons
The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons

The researchers collected information about pairs of granddaughters and grandmothers and sequenced portions of the X-chromosome from 186 women affected by cancer.

The results proposed that a gene on the X-chromosome may contribute to a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer, independently of other known susceptibility genes, such as the BRCA genes.

This observation suggests that there may be many cases of seemingly sporadic ovarian cancer that are actually inherited, and may lead to improved cancer screening and better genetic risk assessment.

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However, future studies will be needed to confirm the identity and function of this gene.

“What we have to do next is make sure we have the right gene by sequencing more families. This finding has sparked a lot of discussion within our group about how to find these X-linked families,” Eng said.

“It’s an all-or-none kind of pattern: A family with three daughters who all have ovarian cancer is more likely to be driven by inherited X mutations than by BRCA mutations,” Eng noted. (IANS)

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