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Designers and weavers steal the show at Rajasthan Heritage Week

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Jaipur: Myriad interpretations of draping a sari or dhoti emerged on the Rajasthan Heritage Week (RHW) ramp, where designers, textile revivalists and weavers showcased their creative prowess.

The concluding day of the three-day gala here on Saturday night saw well-known designer duo Abraham and Thakore do a modernised take on the block printing technique of the state.

They used unusual block prints like houndstooth for tops, jackets, saris and more, apart from interspersing Rajasthani mojaris in their line for an extra edge.

Rajesh Thakore said they worked closely with khadi weavers and block printers to create the bespoke line for the event, and now they will even showcase an extension of the line at Paris.

Textile scholar Rita Kapur Chishti, who has been involved with research and development of handspun-handloom textiles, showcased the wonders of the six-yard cloth.

The draping, styling and pleating were far from the usual, and definitely gave onlookers innovative ideas to employ saris in day-to-day as well as occasion wear.

After the riot of colours that Chishti showcased, there was an all-natural khadi line by New York-based Swedish designer Lars Anderrson, whose take on unfinished garments was interesting to say the least.

He worked with raw fibre and tribal yarn to create anti-fit clothes stitched inside-out and unhemmed.

Next up was weaver Mustakeem Kachara from Kaithoon in Kota district.

His expertise lay in zari-laden Kota doria saris, but what stood out was how he has embraced abstract designs with changing times while also retaining the old world charm of the traditional motifs.

The National Award winner’s opening sari was a take on fruits, featuring strawberries, bananas, apple, et al. Need we say more?

The saga of the sari and sarongs continued with Pavithra Muddaya of Bengaluru’s famed handloom revivalist label Vimor. Her creations, in natural fibers such as cotton, silk, linen and bamboo, saw the use of motifs like rose water sprinklers, sheafs of paddy.

The revivalist’s bow to the audience was full of pride as she walked shoulder side by side, and hand-in-hand with her weavers.

Then came a double finale — Rohit and Abhishek followed by a showcase by Jaipur Modern.

Rohit and Abhishek, who are inspired by regalia of the Rajasthan royalty, brought an all-male line which had pieces made in wool khadi. Their designs were smart and wearable.

Abhishek even brought to the ramp a 94-year-old Bhagwan Sahay, a freedom fighter, whom he said had dedicated his life to the revival of Khadi.

Appreciating an initiative like RHW, Abhishek said Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje Scindia has always gone out of her way to support the cause of sustaining the arts, crafts and heritage of the state.

This, as witnessed by all attendees, was also evident from Raje’s presence at the gala on all three days, and she even shopped at the Crafts Bazaar at the venue here.

The showcase by Jaipur Modern, featuring a range of creations like open coats, dresses, boxer shorts, t-shirts, gowns and more, brought the curtains down on the gala.

(IANS)

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Famous Indian Forts You Must Visit At Least Once

Indian forts like Agra Fort and Red Fort are even recognised by  UNESCO as World Heritage Sites

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India is one of the countries in the world which is famous for its architecture especially forts.
India is one of the countries in the world which is famous for its architecture especially forts. Pixabay

By Ruchika Verma

  • India is famous for its architecture, especially forts
  • Indian forts are some of the most famous forts in the world
  • Indian forts are a great way of learning about Indian history and culture

India is the land of history and culture. The Indian architecture is one of the best in the world. Indian palaces and forts are some of the most admired architectural structures in the world who people come to see and visit from all around the globe. India has some of the biggest forts in the world.

India is famous for its forts and architectures.
India is famous for its forts and architectures. Wikimedia Commons

Indian forts like Agra Fort and Red Fort are even recognised by  UNESCO as World Heritage Sites. India, especially Rajasthan is famous for its forts. It is not unfair to say that most part of India’s tourism thrives on these forts. Here is the list of Indian forts you must visit at least once.

Red Fort

Red Fort in Delhi is one of the most famous forts in India. Th red-stoned fort in Delhi is very central to the Mughal architecture. The Red Fort is a must visit because of its rich culture and history. There are two museums in the fort where one can look at the old arms and clothes of the Mughal rulers.

Also Read: 7 Forts in India you must visit: Glorious Empires of Incredible India

Red Fort in Delhi is one of the apex of Mughal architecture . Pixabay
Red Fort in Delhi is one of the apexes of Mughal architecture. Pixabay

Amer Fort

Amer Fort or the Amber Fort is one of the most explored travelling destinations in Jaipur. It is one of the most well-maintained forts in India and attracts lakhs of tourists towards it every year. One can also enjoy elephant rides in the fort. The Ganesh Pol is one of the most beautifully carved place in the fort.

Famous Forts in India
Amer fort in Jaipur one of the most well-maintained forts in India. (Pic Credits: Elene Machaidze)

Chittorgarh Fort

Chittorgarh Fort is in Rajasthan and is the biggest fort in India. It is spread over in the area of 400 acres. The two pillars called Kirti Stambh and Vijay Stambh are famous for beautiful carvings on them. The fort has water body, temples, complexes and memorials which definitely deserve more exploration by more people.

Chittorgarh Fort is the biggest Indian form and a national heritage site. Wikimedia Commons
Chittorgarh Fort is the biggest Indian form and a national heritage site. Wikimedia Commons

Gwalior Fort

Gwalior Fort in Madhya Pradesh is one of the most majestic forts of central India. The fort for its military architecture and beautifully painted fortress wall. The Fort brings together religions like Buddhism and Jainism and is definitely a treat for the eyes.

Gwalior Fort in Madhya Pradesh is one of the most important forts in Central india. Wikimedia Commons
Gwalior Fort in Madhya Pradesh is one of the most important forts in Central India. Wikimedia Commons

Agra Fort

One of the biggest forts in India, Agra Fort is also referred as a walled city because of its massive expansion in 94 acres of area. The fort has special significance because it was here that the Kohinoor diamond was snatched away by the Mughal ruler Babur and it is also the very place where Shah Jahan died.

Famous Forts in India
Agra Fort can easily be called a small city in itself because of its huge size.Wikimedia Commons

Jaisalmer Fort 

Jaisalmer Fort is one of the biggest forts in the world. Jaisalmer fort is built on the Trikuta Hill in the Thar Desert with a very strong fortification. The fort is full of historical significance and is famous for the various battles and the bloodshed it has witnessed. This is also one of those India forts which are famous for witnessing Jauhar.

Also Read: Jaipur Forts: All You Need To Know

City Palace

City Palace in Udaipur is one of the most beautiful Indian palaces with a history of more than 400 years. It is a beautiful example of Rajasthani and Mughlai architecture fusion, located on the banks of Lake Pichola. The palace is definitely worth a visit for its magnificence.

City Palace Jaipur clicked by Shaurya Ritwik
City Palace is famous for its magnificence. (Pic Credits: Shaurya Ritwik)

Panhala fort

Panhala fort in Kolhapur is the largest and most important fort in Maharashtra, looking over the Sahyadri mountain range. This is one the Indian forts which perfectly describe the Marathi architectural style. This fort will neither disappoint the history buffs nor the people who have just come for sightseeing.