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From battling ground to home ground: If hunger strike fails, ex-servicemen will march for OROP

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By Ishan Kukreti

The current NDA government is drawing fire from many quarters. After students, former military men are protesting against the government for delaying the one rank one pension scheme. The erstwhile soldiers have gone on an indefinite hunger strike at Jantar Mantar since Monday.

Ex Major-General Satbir Singh, convener of the protest said that the government had not contacted the protesters. He added, “In case the hunger strike doesn’t work, we will march to Bihar around the election time and tell people about the government’s stand on the issue.”

The current pension scheme had major flaws which led the government to come up with one rank one pension scheme. Ex Group Captain, V.K. Gandhi explains, “The present scheme is very faulty. Right now, the junior ranks get more pension than the higher ranks in many cases. Those who have retired before 1996 receive less than those who retired after that year, irrespective of their ranks.”

Although the scheme was approved on June 1, 2014 and a budgetary allotment of Rs. 8000 Cr has allegedly been made, no further steps have been taken so far.

“Soldiers are here to take bullets for the country while the politicians relax and enjoy life. Why do they raise slogans like “Jai Jawan, Jai Kisan” when both are treated like this in our country,” said a highly disgruntled member of the gathering.

 

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Facebook Rolls out its Transparency Tools for Global Advertisers

In countries where Facebook is not yet detecting or reviewing these ads, “these tools provide their constituents with more information about who’s influencing their vote — and we suggest voters and local regulators hold these elected officials and influential groups accountable as well”

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FILE - An Indian man surfs a Facebook page at an Internet cafe in New Delhi, India, Feb. 9, 2016. VOA

Facebook has rolled out its transparency tools globally for advertisers wanting to place ads about social issues, elections or politics.

The social networkin0g platform already requires that advertisers get authorized and add disclaimers to political ads in over 50 countries and territories, including in India.

“Now we’re expanding proactive enforcement on these ads to countries where elections or regulations are approaching, starting with Ukraine, Singapore, Canada and Argentina,” Sarah Schiff, Product Manager at Facebook said in a blog post on Tuesday.

As part of the authorization process for advertisers, Facebook confirms their ID and allow them to disclose who is responsible for the ad, which will appear on the ad itself.

The ad and “Paid for by” disclaimer are placed in the Ad Library for seven years, along with more information such as range of spend and impressions, as well as demographics of who saw it.

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FILE – The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square, March 29, 2018. VOA

“The authorization process will not change in countries where we’ve previously launched, and people who previously authorized will not need to reauthorize,” said the company.

“Beginning today, we will systematically detect and review ads in Ukraine and Canada through a combination of automated and human review. In Singapore and Argentina, we will begin enforcement within the next few months,” said Facebook which also plans to roll out the Ad Library Report in both of those countries after enforcement is in place.

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“We’re also rolling out access to our Ad Library API globally so regulators, journalists, watchdog groups and other people can analyze ads about social issues, elections or politics and help hold advertisers and Facebook accountable,” said Facebook.

In countries where Facebook is not yet detecting or reviewing these ads, “these tools provide their constituents with more information about who’s influencing their vote — and we suggest voters and local regulators hold these elected officials and influential groups accountable as well”. (IANS)