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Handling the disposal of religious texts

Scriptural religions based on text have different rules for when and how those texts can be discarded

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Guidelines on how religious books should be handled once they are worn out vary by religion and sect

A perfect Quran should not be destroyed. Jews may bury Torah scrolls in graves or a special storage room. Roman Catholics can bury Bibles while Evangelical Protestants do not have specific guidelines.

The three major Abrahamic faiths have different rules for when and how their religious texts can be discarded. Here are some of the traditions:
  • Islam: A Quran may be discarded if there is an error in the text or if the volume is worn out. In that case, religious scholars say there are two preferred ways of doing it – wrapping it in cloth and burying it, or washing away the text with water.
  • Roman Catholicism: Catholics can bury a Bible when it needs to be disposed of, though there have been instances in the Middle Ages of incineration done in the form of a burnt offering.
  • Protestantism: Protestants do not have special prescriptions about disposing of religious texts, since they view the inspired message and not the physical text as divine.
  • Judaism: In Judaism, any text that contains God’s name should be buried when it is no longer usable, or placed in a dedicated room known as a “Geniza“. Jewish cemeteries often have special graves for sacred texts. Some American rabbis recently ruled that recycling is also appropriate.

Scriptural religions, based on texts are believed to be the word of God – have different rules for when and how those texts can be discarded. But what they have in common is a reverence shown for such texts, with practices such as kissing it or never placing another book on top of it.

In Afghanistan, a deadly violence broke out after U.S. military servicemen disposed off several copies of the Quran by burning them.

Also Read: Dharma Shastras: Ancient texts that surpass modern notions of liberty and social harmony
Rizwan Jaka of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society near Washington says he accepts U.S. explanations that the burning was inadvertent. He notes that the Quran itself teaches Muslims to “repel bad with good.”

Sarah Thomson, spokeswoman for the Islamic Society of North America , says the proper way of responding to the desecration of Qurans is by donating new ones or teaching how to respect the religious text.

The only reason a Quran may be destroyed is if there are errors like misspellings, missing pages or inaccurate translations in a language other than Arabic, she says.

“You wouldn’t destroy them because they are old,” she says.

In those cases, Thomson says the consensus among Muslim religious scholars is that the proper methods for disposal are wrapping it in clean cloth and burying it, or immersion in water.

However, some scholars say if those methods are not possible, a Quran may be burned if done in a respectful way, preferably at a mosque.

Afghans jointly read Islam's holy book "Quran" during a celebration to mark the anniversary Image: VOA
Afghans jointly read Islam’s holy book “Quran” during a celebration to mark the anniversary
Image: VOA

Many Jewish cemeteries have special graves for Torah scrolls and other documents as anything that contains God’s name should be buried when it is no longer usable. It can also be placed in a dedicated room known as a geniza. In 1896, a geniza was found in Cairo, Egypt, with hundreds of thousands of Jewish texts dating back to before the ninth century including marriage contracts and legal and financial documents.

Rabbi Paul Drazen of the United Synagogue for Conservative Judaism says that several years ago the movement’s rabbis ruled that recycling is also an appropriate means of disposal.

Drazen says the burning of Torahs has an emotional component in Judaism. “Throughout generations Jewish texts were burned as part of the torture of individuals and it also preceded the Holocaust,” he says.

Muslims and Jews have ways of showing respect for holy texts. Muslims will wash themselves before reading from a Quran, while Jews read with a silver pointer so as not to touch the parchment of a Torah scroll.

Hindu texts can be disposed off in water- by burning them or by burial. However, Arumuga Swami, managing editor of Hinduism Today says, often “the issue doesn’t come up” because a whole category of Hindu scriptures, the Vedas is memorized.

Christian guidelines vary according to denomination. For Roman Catholics, “the bottom line is that Bibles should be buried out of reverence for the sacred text,” says Monsignor Kevin Irwin, who teaches liturgical studies at the Catholic University of America.

On the other hand, Evangelical Protestants don’t have specific guidelines. This is largely because it is the inspired message rather than the physical artifact that is considered divine, according to Greg Wills of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

“Paper and ink is perishable but the word of God lives forever,” says Wills. (VOA News)

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War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman.

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War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia commons
War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia Commons
  • Jordanian King Abdullah II said that war against terrorism is not a fight between religions
  • He says that it is between moderates and extremists
  • The king also targets media which portrays terrorism in a wrong way

Visiting Jordanian King Abdullah II on Thursday said that the global war against terror was not a fight between different religions but between moderates and extremists.

King abdullah said terrorism is not about fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons
King Abdullah said terrorism is not about the fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons

“Today’s global war against terror is not a fight between different religions or people. It is between moderates of all faiths and communities against extremism, hate and violence,” the King said while addressing a conference on ‘Islamic Heritage: Promoting Understanding and Moderation’ here in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

“What is heard in the news and what is shown about religion is what separates people,” he said.

He added that around the world, suspicions are inflamed by what different groups don’t know about others.

“Such ideologies of hate distort the word of God — to stir up conflicts and justify crimes and terror.

“We need to take these things seriously…they should never be allowed to distract us from the truth that faith should draw humanity together.”

Also Read: Documentary ‘Salam Neighbor’ shows Daily Life of Syrian Refugees in Jordan

He said faith inspires countries like India and Jordan where different religious and ethnic groups have lived together.

“It is faith that brings together different civilisations together.

Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons
Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons

Compassion, mercy, tolerance are values shared by billions of Muslims and non-Muslims around the world.”

“These values put us together to act for our coming future,” he said.

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman. IANS