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Humans existed in Bengaluru 4 lakh years ago, claims Archaeologist

"The discovery confirms man's existence in this area during the Stone Age," claimed Dr K B Shivatarak, retired professor of ancient history and archaeology, Mangalore University

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Palaeolithic stone tools. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Shivatarak claims that the evidence was discovered in May 2016 near the Kadirenahalli underpass at Bendrenagar, Banashankari II Stage
  • The five stone implements collected by him from Banashankari includes scraper, miniature hand axe, leaf-like instrument, hand axe and hand stone
  • The remains are similar to that of stones founded near Abhimaan Studio near Kengeri

BENGALURU: An archaeologist claimed that Bengaluru city may have been home to humans since four lakh years and believes that he has unearthed the earliest pre-historic evidence in Bengaluru for the first time.

“The discovery confirms man’s existence in this area during the Stone Age,” claimed Dr K B Shivatarak, retired professor of ancient history and archaeology, Mangalore University.

Skeleton of Prehistoric Men. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
The skeleton of Prehistoric Men. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shivatarak claims that the evidence was discovered in May 2016 near the Kadirenahalli underpass at Bendrenagar, Banashankari II Stage. BWSSB had decided to fix the leakage in the area by digging the road, mentioned the TOI report on July 7, 2016.

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Shivatarak was curious to look onto the stones, the workers have found out. When he washed the stones he found them closely related to the instruments he founded in Tumakuru, Mandya and Chitradurga districts where he researched earlier.

Palaeolithic stone instruments. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Palaeolithic stone instruments. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The five stone instruments collected by him from Banashankari includes scraper, miniature hand axe, a leaf-like instrument, hand axe and hand stone. The miniature hand axe was made of quartz and quartzite. All the instruments were around 7-11cm long and 4-7cm broad.

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According to Shivtarak, the instruments were used by the prehistoric man for the hunting purposes. The stones were widely used in hunting and peeling off the animal skin. Shivatarak had not yet informed the archaeological department about his findings.

Miniature hand axe. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Miniature hand axe. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Shivatarak claimed, this is the first time that Palaeolithic remains have been found in Bengaluru. The remains are similar to that of stones founded near Abhimaan Studio near Kengeri.

“I am studying these findings in detail,” said Shivatarak.

But, the other archaeologists are doubtful about the fact that whether the stone age was inhabited in the area where later Bengaluru came up. According to Prof. Ravi Kori Settar, retired professor of archaeology at Karnataka University, there is no scope for the Palaeolithic stone instruments in Bengaluru as no quartzite dig was found in the city, mentioned the TOI report.

Quartzite Cobbles. Image Source: www.pinterest.com
Quartzite Cobbles. Image Source: www.pinterest.com

Professor Settar also claimed that no Palaeolithic tools can be found in the granite area and hence must be Pseudolithic (look likes of Palaeolithic) or Erolits (mimic Palaeolithic caused due to some natural activity).

– prepared by Aparna Gupta, an intern with NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna99

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  • Akanksha Sharma

    Wow, great article. Great information.

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Female Mobility Key Element in Cultural Interchange during Stone Age and Bronze Age: Study

4,000 years ago European women left their birth settlements and travelled far to form families, taking with them new objects and cultural ideas

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Female mobility during the Stone Age and Bronze Age was a key element in cultural interchange (Representational Image). Pixabay

Berlin, Sep 05, 2017: Female mobility during the final phase of the Stone Age and start of the Bronze Age was a key element in cultural interchange between regions, according to a new study.

The study, published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) magazine, shows how 4,000 years ago European women left their birth settlements and travelled far to form families, taking with them new objects and cultural ideas, Germany’s Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History said.

The report is based on the graves found in the Lech valley, south of the city of Augsburg, reports Efe news.

In the families living in the settlements in the region at that time, the majority of women came from other areas, probably from Bohemia or central Germany several hundred kilometres away, while the men normally remained in or very near their birth location.

According to the researchers, this “patrilocal” type of social pattern, in which new couples live in the territory of the man’s family, combined with individual female mobility, was not a temporary phenomenon but rather lasted for some 800 years during the transition from the Stone Age to the Bronze Age.

Participating in the study headed by Philipp Stockhammer, of Munich’s Ludwig-Maximilians University, were Corina Knipper of the Curt-Engelhorn-Centre for Archaeometry, along with Alissa Mittnik and Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institute and the University of Tuebingen.

Also Read: Woman Medical Pioneers from India, Syria, and Japan Who Traveled to Philadelphia in 1885 

“Individual mobility was a major feature characterising the lives of people in Central Europe even in the third and early second millennium,” said Stockhammer regarding a phenomenon that the researchers believe fostered the development of new technologies in the Bronze Age.

The scientific team used genetic and isotope analysis along with archaeological evaluations to research the remains of 84 individuals buried between 2,500 and 1,650 B.C. in cemeteries belonging to individual homesteads and containing up to several dozen burials made over several generations. (IANS)

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‘Namma Bengaluru Habba’ : Green Festival in Bengaluru Witnesses 1,000 people taking part in the event

People from all walks of life participated in Bengaluru's Green Festival

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A man on Jet Ski, Green Festival, Bengaluru
A man on Jet Ski, Green Festival, Bengaluru. Pixabay
  • The fest had about 20 artists who performed the traditional ‘Yakshagana’ theatre and drum dance dollu kunita
  • Visitors had an opportunity to cruise around the lake with fly boards and jet skis
  • As environment protection is a cause of concern, it is events like these that will create awareness among the public and lead to greater sustainability

Bengaluru, August 21, 2017: About 1,000 people from all walks of life took part in a cultural festival titled ‘Namma Bengaluru Habba’ (Our Bengaluru Festival) at the Sankey Tank here on Sunday to create awareness on the protection of environment.

Organised by the Karnataka Tourism Department, the fest had about 20 artists who performed the traditional ‘Yakshagana’ theatre, and drum dance ‘dollu kunita’, while apart from the street musicians, magicians, jugglers, caricature artists and painters, visitors had an opportunity to cruise around the lake with fly boards and jet skis.

There were also 20 stalls and a flea market selling organic produce and eco-friendly products, including terracotta jewellery, natural soaps, millet-based products and jute etc.

“As environmental protection is a cause of concern, it is events like these that will create awareness among the public and lead to greater sustainability,” said state Information Technology, Biotechnology and Tourism Minister Priyank M. Kharge in a statement.

“It is great to see so many people participating in support of the cause. The fest is a community building activity to preserve Bengaluru’s ecology,” he added. (IANS)

 

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Israeli Archaeologists Discover 2,000-year-old Stone Factory in Galilee

This factory is known to produce vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine

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Stone vessels used by Jews in Israel during Roman period. Wikimedia
  • This factory produced vessels similar to the ones Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine
  • During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics
  • Galilee is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water

Tel Aviv, August 11, 2017: Israeli archaeologists have discovered a 2,000-year-old stone factory in Galilee that produced vessels similar to the one Jesus Christ used to turn water into wine.

Excavations began after the site was discovered during construction work for a municipal sports centre, reports Efe news.

“The fact that Jews at this time used stone vessels for religious reasons is well attested in the Talmudic sources and in the New Testament as well,” Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Yardenna Alexandre said on Thursday.

ALSO READ: Egypt discovers new necropolis with as many as 30 intact mummies near the city of Minya

During the Roman period, vessels were made of ceramics: a material Jews considered impure and inappropriate for purification rituals because it is breakable, so they opted instead to use stone.

“It is possible that large stone containers of the type mentioned in the wedding at Cana of Galilee story may have been produced locally in Galilee,” Alexandre said.

“Our excavations are highlighting the pivotal role of ritual purity observance – not only in Jerusalem, but in the far-off Galilee as well,” excavation director Yonatan Adler said.

Galilee is a fertile, mountainous region in northern Israel. It is known for the Sea of Galilee, where Jesus Christ is said to have walked on water. (IANS)